2017-18
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Medicinal Chemistry BS

(HEGIS: 19.10 PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY, CIP: 40.0599 Chemistry, Other)

Chemistry

363 Natural Sciences Building
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-3000
Ph: 716-645-6626
F: 716-645-6963
W: chemistry.buffalo.edu
David F. Watson
Chair
Jerome Keister
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Amanda MacKellar
Undergraduate Secretary

Why study Medicinal Chemistry BS at UB?

The Medicinal Chemistry BS provides:

  1. A basic chemical understanding of life processes and biological control
  2. A chemical basis for the rational design, synthesis, and mechanism of action of drugs, and selective metabolic inhibition
  3. The basic laboratory skills necessary for research in medicinal chemistry
  4. An appreciation of medicinal chemistry and the chemical aspects of pharmacology
  5. A foundation for post-baccalaureate study in medicinal chemistry and professional studies in the health sciences

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of all requirements, the student will have knowledge to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge in the basic sub-divisions of the science (organic, inorganic, analytical, physical and biological chemistry)
  • Use modern instrumentation and classical laboratory techniques
  • Design and conduct scientific experiments for the purpose of solving a scientific problem and to record and analyze the results
  • Understand the proper procedures for safe use of chemicals and can follow the proper procedures for chemical waste disposal
  • Use modern library searching and retrieval methods to obtain information about a topic, chemical, chemical technique, or an issue relating to chemistry
  • Identify and solve chemical problems and explore new areas of research
  • Understand the chemical basis for the rational design, synthesis, and mechanism of action of drugs, and selective metabolic inhibition
  • Find employment in industry or government or be accepted at graduate or professional schools (pharmacy, medicine, etc.)

The Learning Environment

The Chemistry program features a wide variety of class sizes, types, and delivery methods. Most General Chemistry courses consist of 3 hours of lecture per week (class sizes of ca. 360) presented by Ph. D. level faculty, in addition to 1 hour of recitation and 3 hours of laboratory (class sizes of ca. 22 students) supervised by a graduate student teaching assistant. Organic chemistry courses in the second year consist of 3 hours of lecture per week (class sizes of ca. 275) presented by Ph. D. level faculty, in addition to 1 hour of recitation and 3 hours of laboratory (class sizes of ca. 16 students) supervised by a graduate student teaching assistant. In the third and fourth year classes are generally restricted to chemistry majors. Lecture classes have enrollments of 100 to 16 and use a variety of delivery methods. Laboratory courses are low enrollment and are taught by Chemistry faculty with graduate student teaching assistants; these are heavily hands-on and with state-of-the-art instrumentation. The Department strongly encourages undergraduate research; this is conducted in the individual research groups of tenured or tenure-track faculty.

About Our Facilities

The Department of Chemistry is housed in the Natural Sciences Complex (NSC) on the North Campus. The Department occupies about 112,000 square feet of space, including 32,000 square feet for teaching laboratories and 54,000 square feet of research laboratory space. Also included are support services, such as instrumentation labs, electronic shop, stockrooms, and conference rooms.

The Chemistry Department Instrument Center maintains and operates a number of instruments that facilitate a variety of research. These include multiple mass spectrometers for analysis of ions in gas, solution and solid phases, including accurate mass confirmation. Liquid and gas chromatographs are coupled with mass spectrometry to enhance mixture analysis. Ionization techniques include electron impact, electrospray, chemical ionization, and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization. Other techniques available include FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning spectrophotometry, and differential scanning calorimetry. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometers include a Varian Gemini 300, Varian 400, 500, 600 and 750MHZ NMR for structure studies.

About Our Faculty

The staff of the Department of Chemistry includes 30 tenured or tenure-track full-time faculty (all Ph. D.), 2 full-time lecturers, 84 teaching assistants (all graduate students), and 18 support staff. Faculty members deliver lecture courses and supervise teaching assistants who are responsible for oversight of laboratory courses. The chemistry faculty includes a number of Ph.D. scientists who maintain active research programs in medicinal chemistry. Many of these have grants and contracts awarded in competitions with other scientists to support their research. The majority of outside support is from the National Institutes of Health. Faculty also hold memberships in various national organizations and several have been honored for their contributions to science.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit our department website for additional information about our faculty.

Career Outlook

Career Choices

  • Government scientist
  • Medicinal chemist in the pharmaceutical industry
  • Organic chemist
  • Pharmaceutical sales representative
  • Teacher
  • Technical librarian

Alumni in Medicinal Chemistry have found employment in the following fields:

  • Academe (Professor of Medicinal Chemistry)
  • Government (Food & Drug Administration)
  • Medicinal chemistry (pharmaceutical industry)
  • Pharmaceutical sales (pharmaceutical industry)

What percentage of graduates goes on to find related employment?

Approximately 100% (The department knows of no graduate who is unemployed.)

Salary Trends

The median salary for chemists with bachelor's degrees, including medicinal chemists, was $77,000 in 2015. The median starting salary for new bachelor's graduates was $40,000 in 2014. The industry seeks to hire graduates who have good laboratory experience. In this regard, M.S. graduates are good prospects for employment in the pharmaceutical industry and are paid correspondingly more and given more responsibility.

Academic Advising

Students may be referred to Dr. Jerome Keister, the director of undergraduate studies, for advisement regarding the prerequisite courses and any other aspect of the program and discipline. Students are advised to meet with him at least once every semester to discuss career goals and curriculum. Academic progress is evaluated at the end of each semester. Students should apply for admission to the department as early as possible in their academic career.

Academic Advising Contact Information

Dr. Jerome Keister

Director of Undergraduate Studies

keister@buffalo.edu

Scholarships and Financial Support

Alan Cutler Undergraduate Scholarship

Albert Padwa Award
Ralph F. Theuer Scholarship Award 
William E. Townsend Scholarship
Peter T. Lansbury Undergraduate Research Award
Sol J. Lederman Undergraduate Research Fellowship 

Experiential Learning

Students are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research through CHE 290 or MCH 498.

External internships may be used to serve as research opportunities.

Extracurricular Activities

Medicinal chemistry students are welcome to join the chemistry undergraduate club, the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society.

See the UB Student Association.

Honors and Awards

Academic Excellence in Chemistry—Given annually to graduating seniors with the following GPA levels: Distinction—3.20-3.499; High Distinction—3.50-3.749; Highest Distinction—3.75-4.00.

Academic Excellence in Medicinal Chemistry—Given annually to graduating seniors with the following GPA levels: Distinction—3.20-3.499; High Distinction—3.50-3.749; Highest Distinction—3.75-4.00.

American Institute of Chemists Award—Administered by the American Institute of Chemists (AIC), the award honors outstanding seniors.

College of Arts & Sciences Dean’s Outstanding Senior Award—Annually, the Dean honors the best senior graduating from each department in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) with the “Dean’s Outstanding Senior Award”, consisting of a medal and certificate presented at the University Commencement ceremony.

Departmental Honors

Medicinal chemistry students are eligible for the same awards as chemistry students.

Academic Excellence in Chemistry—Given annually to graduating seniors with the following GPA levels: Distinction—3.20-3.499; High Distinction—3.50-3.749; Highest Distinction—3.75-4.00.

Becoming a(n) Medicinal Chemistry BS Student

Becoming a University at Buffalo Student

Admission to UB is highly competitive. For the 2016 incoming freshman class, UB reported an average ACT score of 24-30 and an average SAT (CR+M) score of 1100-1300. 90 percent of admitted students are in the top 50 percent of their class.

Admission to UB is based on a holistic review. We consider high school average, class rank, SAT (critical reading and math) or ACT scores, and strength of the high school academic record. A personal essay, recommendations, documented creative talent, demonstrated leadership, community service and special circumstances are also considered.

The following is not required for admission, but is suggested as adequate preparation for university-level coursework:

  • Four years of English (with a substantial writing component)
  • Four years of social studies
  • Three years of college-preparatory science
  • Three years of a second language
  • Three years of college-preparatory mathematics

Visit Undergraduate Admissions to learn more.

Freshman Admission to the Program

During the second term of the freshman year, the prospective majors should apply for admission to our programs directly through the Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Office located at 363 Natural Science and Math Complex.

Transfer Admission to the Program

Transfer students from accredited institutions generally have little difficulty in making the transition to SUNY at Buffalo even though their freshman and sophomore degree requirements may not have been completed. It is recommended that applicants complete General Chemistry and College Calculus I and II in the freshman year. Organic Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Calculus III and the calculus-based Physics sequence should be completed by the sophomore year. If there is any doubt about the courses needed to meet our departmental requirements, courses which are specifically designated as being for science or engineering majors are the natural choice. Chemistry, Physics and Calculus courses which are designed to satisfy the needs of Social Science or Pre-med Majors should be avoided. Advanced Placement credit in Chemistry will transfer only as elective credit. Advanced Placement credit in Calculus will transfer.

Suggested Introductory Courses

BIO 201 Cell Biology
CHE 105 Chemistry: Principles and Applications I (preferred) or CHE 101 General Chemistry I
MTH 141 College Calculus I

Completing the Medicinal Chemistry BS Program

Academic Requirements

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall required.

Transfer Credit Policy

The Department of Chemistry does not evaluate credit hours from the transfer institution—this is the responsibility of the Office of Admissions. However, the Director of Undergraduate Studies is able to make value judgments concerning whether or not a departmental degree requirement has been completed. The judgment is made primarily on the basis of exposure to the subject matter and not merely on the basis of the number of credit hours earned or the title of the course. Rather, prerequisites and the number of lectures and laboratory sessions per week are used as a general guide. In almost every case the Director finds that the students have correctly evaluated the course in question. If there is a disagreement, a petitioning procedure is available to the student. Difficulties are very seldom serious enough to delay graduation beyond the fourth year of academic study.

Prerequisite Courses

CHE 101-102 or 105-106
BIO 201
MTH 141-142
Overall GPA 2.0

Required Courses

BIO 201 Cell Biology
CHE 101 General Chemistry or CHE 105 Chemistry Principles and Applications
CHE 102 General Chemistry or CHE 106 Chemistry Principles and Applications
CHE 201 Organic Chemistry or CHE 251 Contemporary Organic Chemistry
CHE 202 Organic Chemistry or CHE 252 Contemporary Organic Chemistry
CHE 214 and CHE 215 Analytical Chemistry
CHE 301 Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory
CHE 312 Chemistry of Biological Systems (recommended) or BCH 403 Principles of Biochemistry
CHE 319 Physical Chemistry I
CHE 320 Physical Chemistry II
CHE 321 Inorganic Chemistry I
CHE 455 Synthetic Organic Chemistry
MCH 401 Principles of Med Chem I
MCH 498 Undergraduate Research Participation in Medicinal Chemistry*
MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab
One chemistry laboratory elective course chosen from: CHE 322, CHE 329, or CHE 330
15 credit hours of science electives

*MCH 498 is recommended, not required.

Total Credit Hours Required

Credits Required for Major 84
Additional Credits Required for UB Curriculum   32
Additional Credits Required for Electives   4
Total Credits Required for Degree 120


Students should consult with an academic advisor to determine how any transfer or exam credit might be utilized in meeting general education, prerequisite, or major requirements.

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Curricular Plan / Degree Map

View the curricular plan for the Medicinal Chemistry BS (PDF) which is a recommended sequence of courses to help achieve this degree in four years.

Chemistry

363 Natural Sciences Building
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-3000
Ph: 716-645-6626
F: 716-645-6963
W: chemistry.buffalo.edu
David F. Watson
Chair
Jerome Keister
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Amanda MacKellar
Undergraduate Secretary

Curricular Plan

Medicinal Chemistry BS

Subjects & Courses

Complementary Programs

Published: March 30, 2017 09:20:50 AM