Psychology : Degrees & Policies

Degrees Offered

Undergraduate: BA, BS
Graduate: MA, PhD

Transfer Policy

Transfer students who bring psychology coursework to UB must meet the same criteria for acceptance into the department as students who start at this university. Students may transfer coursework required for admission into the department, as well as additional psychology coursework. However, courses taken in statistics and research methods, as well as upper-level psychology courses, must be evaluated and approved by the department. A minimum of three upper-level psychology courses must be taken at UB.

SUNY Seamless Transfer Path

SUNY Seamless Transfer is a SUNY-wide program intended to make transferring to UB and other SUNY Schools simple and efficient for SUNY students. SUNY has defined courses that SUNY students can take before transferring which will apply to the major at UB and ensure timely graduation.

Information about the Transfer Path for this major can be found on the SUNY Website.

Students are encouraged to contact their academic advisor or department to discuss how their coursework will apply to their degree.

Psychology - B.A.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Minimum GPA of 2.5 in prerequisite courses before full acceptance.

Advising Notes

A minimum GPA of 2.0 in psychology courses is required for graduation. Majors whose GPAs in psychology courses fall below 2.0 during any semester are automatically placed on probation. Majors whose GPAs remain below 2.0 in consecutive semesters are dismissed from the department.
PSY 495 Undergraduate Supervised Teaching and PSY 496 Supervised Applied Experience do not count toward the course requirements for majors.
PSY 497 Honors, PSY 498 Undergraduate Research, and PSY 499 Independent Study may be taken for degree credit, but only 3 credit hours from this group count toward major requirements.
400-level courses are open only to psychology majors. Students are advised to go to 283 Park Hall and to apply early for the major, preferably while enrolled in PSY 250. Acceptance decisions can then be made contingent upon completion of PSY 250, and registration in upper-level courses is facilitated.
Students who have completed 60 credit hours but have not completed the prerequisite courses or achieved the minimum GPA of 2.5 may be provisionally accepted by the department (283 Park Hall). Students who are accepted provisionally must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the prerequisites to be fully accepted into the department. Students who do not have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the prerequisites must repeat appropriate prerequisite coursework. The second grade in the repeated course is honored by the department for the purpose of admission to the psychology major.

Prerequisite Courses

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology
ULC 148 Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent* or higher
PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
PSY 250 Scientific Inquiry in Psychology

Required Courses

Seven additional PSY courses distributed as follows:
Four 300-level courses, one from each of the four substantive areas listed after the B.S. chart
Minimum of three courses at the 400 level

Undergraduate Credit Requirements Chart
Credits Required for Major35
Additional Credits Required for Gen Ed 35
Additional Credits Required for Electives 50
Total Credits Required for Degree 120

Students should consult with an academic advisor to determine how any transfer or exam credit might be utilized in meeting general education, prerequisite, or major requirements.

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements & Learning Outcomes

FIRST YEAR
Fall PSY 101, ULC 148* or higher, ENG 101 or ENG 201, Language 1, UBE 101 or equivalent, Library Skills requirement
Spring PSY 207, one 300-level PSY elective, ENG 201 or Humanities, Language 2

SECOND YEAR
Fall PSY 250, one 300-level PSY elective, UGC 111, Natural Science 1, free elective
Spring One 300-level PSY elective, UGC 112, Natural Science 2, two free electives

THIRD YEAR
Fall One 300-level PSY elective, Arts, American Pluralism, two free electives
Spring One 400-level PSY elective, four free electives

FOURTH YEAR
Fall One 400-level PSY elective, four free electives
Spring One 400-level PSY elective, four free electives

*Unless exempted by SAT score, Advanced Placement credits, or transfer credits

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of all requirements, the student will have knowledge of:
  • Psychology: Students will demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology
  • Research Methods in Psychology: Students will understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation
  • Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology: Students will respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes
  • Application of Psychology: Students will understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues
  • Values in Psychology: Students will be able to weigh evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a discipline
  • Information and Technological Literacy: Students will demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers and other technology for many purposes
  • Communication Skills: Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of formats
  • Sociocultural and International Awareness: Students will recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural and international diversity
  • Personal Development: Students will develop insight into their own and others' behavior and mental processes and apply effective strategies for self-management and self-improvement
  • Career Planning and Development: Students will emerge from the major with realistic ideas about how to implement their psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings
  • Psychology - B.S.

    Acceptance Criteria

    Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
    Minimum GPA of 2.5 in prerequisite courses before full acceptance.

    Advising Notes

    A minimum GPA of 2.0 in psychology courses is required for graduation. Majors whose GPAs in psychology courses fall below 2.0 during any semester are automatically placed on probation. Majors whose GPAs remain below 2.0 in consecutive semesters are dismissed from the department.
    PSY 495 Undergraduate Supervised Teaching and PSY 496 Supervised Applied Experience do not count toward the course requirements for majors.
    PSY 497 Honors, PSY 498 Undergraduate Research, and PSY 499 Independent Study may be taken for degree credit, but only 3 credit hours from this group count toward major requirements.
    400-level courses are open only to psychology majors. Students are advised to go to 283 Park Hall and to apply early for the major, preferably while enrolled in PSY 250. Acceptance decisions can then be made contingent upon completion of PSY 250, and registration in upper-level courses is facilitated.

    Prerequisite Courses

    10 credit hours in psychology and 8 credit hours in mathematics:
    PSY 101 Introductory Psychology
    PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
    PSY 250 Scientific Inquiry in Psychology
    One two-course mathematics sequence (MTH 121-MTH 122 Survey of Calculus and Its Applications I-II or MTH 141-MTH 142 College Calculus I-II)

    Required Courses

    BIO 200 Evolutionary Biology
    CHE 101-CHE 102 General Chemistry or CHE 105-CHE 106 Chemistry: Principles and Applications
    Nine additional PSY courses, distributed as follows:
    Four 300-level courses, one from each of the four substantive areas listed below
    A minimum of five courses at the 400 or graduate level (500 level and above, taken with special permission as part of the undergraduate program), including PSY 450 Advanced Research Methods in Psychology or another laboratory-based upper-level PSY course (from a department-approved list)
    Two of the five 400 level courses must be from the Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Courses, listed below

    Undergraduate Credit Requirements Chart
    Credits Required for Major60
    Additional Credits Required for Gen Ed 28
    Additional Credits Required for Electives 32
    Total Credits Required for Degree 120

    Students should consult with an academic advisor to determine how any transfer or exam credit might be utilized in meeting general education, prerequisite, or major requirements.

    See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

    Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements & Learning Outcomes

    FIRST YEAR
    Fall PSY 101, MTH 121, BIO 200, Language 1 UBE 101 or equivalent, Library Skills requirement
    Spring PSY 207, MTH 122, Language 2, UGC 112

    SECOND YEAR
    Fall PSY 250, one 300-level PSY elective, CHE 101, UGC 111, ENG 101
    Spring One 300-level PSY elective, one free elective, CHE 102, ENG 201 or Humanities

    THIRD YEAR
    Fall Two 300-level PSY electives, Arts, American Pluralism, Humanities/Free elective
    Spring PSY 450, PSY 400-level elective*, three free electives

    FOURTH YEAR
    Fall Two 400-level PSY electives, three free electives
    Spring One 400-level PSY elective*, four free electives

    * Two 400 level PSY must be chosen from the Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience area.

    Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of all requirements, the student will have knowledge of:
  • Psychology: Students will demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology
  • Research Methods in Psychology: Students will understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation
  • Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology: Students will respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes
  • Application of Psychology: Students will understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues
  • Values in Psychology: Students will be able to weigh evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a discipline
  • Information and Technological Literacy: Students will demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers and other technology for many purposes
  • Communication Skills: Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of formats
  • Sociocultural and International Awareness: Students will recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural and international diversity
  • Personal Development: Students will develop insight into their own and others' behavior and mental processes and apply effective strategies for self-management and self-improvement
  • Career Planning and Development: Students will emerge from the major with realistic ideas about how to implement their psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings
  • Electives and Course Groupings

    Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience

    PSY 402 Psychopharmacology
    PSY 416 Reasoning and Problem Solving
    PSY 419 Biological Bases of Memory
    PSY 421 Systems and Theories of Psychology
    PSY 426 Biological Bases of Mental Disorders
    PSY 428 Language Development
    PSY 429 Psychophysiology
    PSY 431 Mind-Body Connection in a Social World
    PSY 434 Animal Behavior
    PSY 435 Psychology of Reproduction
    PSY 436 Neuropsychology
    PSY 439 Biopsychology of Stress
    PSY 440 Hormones and Behavior
    PSY 442 Biopsychology of Ingestive Behavior
    PSY 443 Neurobiology of Communication in Animals
    PSY 445 Memory
    PSY 446 Animal Cognition
    PSY 447 Psychology of Music
    PSY 448 Psycholinguistics
    PSY 451 Drug Addiction
    PSY 457 Cognitive Development
    PSY 470-PSY 475 Senior Seminars (in Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience areas)
    PSY 485-PSY 490 Special Topics (in Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience areas)

    SUBSTANTIVE AREA 1: CLINICAL
    PSY 321 Psychology of Personality
    PSY 322 Abnormal Psychology
    PSY 323 Community Psychology
    PSY 324 Clinical Psychology
    PSY 325 Health Psychology

    SUBSTANTIVE AREA 2: SOCIAL
    PSY 331 Social Psychology
    PSY 332 Social Conflict and Its Resolution
    PSY 333 Psychology of Work in Organizations
    PSY 336 Developmental Psychology

    SUBSTANTIVE AREA 3: COGNITIVE
    PSY 341 Cognitive Psychology
    PSY 342 Introduction to Cognitive Science: Concepts of the Mind
    PSY 343 Sensory Processes and Perception

    SUBSTANTIVE AREA 4: BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
    PSY 351 Biopsychology

    Updated: 18 Feb 2015 13:00:02 EST