2017-18
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Asian Studies (AS)

Asian Studies

412 Clemens Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-4610
Ph: 716-645-3474
W: www.asianstudies.buffalo.edu
EunHee Lee
Director
Mitsuaki Shimojo
Director of Undergraduate Studies

The Learning Environment

The program in Asian Studies offers a variety of courses types from large lecture classes to small seminars. Many of the more advanced undergraduate courses are combined with graduate offerings, allowing undergraduates to get early exposure to graduate-style coursework. Faculty also offer independent studies for students interested in areas that do not match the program's regular offerings. The program provides a capstone experience through a senior seminar, where students work with an advisor to do a research project. It also offers an internship program where students help with the program operation.

About Our Facilities

The Asian Studies Program is housed in Clemens Hall, and has dedicated meeting spaces. The program also holds classes in centrally scheduled space throughout the campus, which includes traditional classrooms and lecture halls that can accommodate the program’s different class structures.

About Our Faculty

The faculty of the Asian Studies program includes over twenty internationally known and respected Asian specialists in a variety of humanities and social sciences fields, focusing on China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, and South Asia.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit the Asian Studies program website for additional information about UB faculty with concentrations in Asia.

AS Courses


  • AS 101LEC Introduction to Asian Studies
    Lecture

    Are you interested in a career related to Asia, or considering studying abroad in Asia? Or maybe you just want to know more about its cultures and histories because your classmates, neighbors, and coworkers are from there? What is Asia, anyway, and who and what should we consider Asian? This class is designed to introduce students to the diversity of Asia and to the resources at UB and beyond for studying Asia and Asian diasporas. Students will develop critical thinking and writing skills while exploring the fields of Asian and Asian-American studies. The class will hear from distinguished UB professors who will discuss the latest research, trends, and resources in the field of Asian and Asian-American studies. Students also will start thinking about the impact of developments in Asia on their career goals and be encouraged to consider study abroad opportunities in Asia.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • AS 110LEC The Asian American Experience
    Lecture

    The Asian American experience from the beginning of Asians' and Pacific Islanders' entry into North America in the eighteenth century to the present. Investigates this phenomenon in connection with national and transnational power relations, economic structures, and political realities. Also considers the construction of American identities in the United States and their impact on Asian American communities and individuals. Goals are to develop a historical and multi-cultural perspective on the Asian American experience, to enlarge students' capacities for analytical and critical thinking, and to achieve a better understanding of the diversity within Asian American communities and of Asian Americans' social status in North America.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • AS 181LEC Asian Civilization 1
    Lecture

    Introduction to major themes and events in the histories of China, Korea, Japan, the Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia in early times. Considers the developments of ways of thought, the emergence of and interactions among states and empires, and artistic and literary movements. Our goal is to understand the historical forces and transformations shaping Asia before about 1600. AAL

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • AS 182LEC Asian Civilization II
    Lecture

    Introduction to major themes and events in the histories of China, Korea, Japan, the Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia in recent centuries. Considers the impacts of colonialism and imperialism, the emergence of nationalist and revolutionary movements, decolonization and the Cold War. Our goal is to understand the historical forces and transformations shaping contemporary Asia, the common experiences that different areas of Asia have shared in the recent past, and what distinguishes the histories of particular Asian nations within a comparative perspective. AAL

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • AS 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • AS 221LEC Survey of Asian Literature
    Lecture

    This course will introduce students to narratives of romance that span Asia's wide variety of religious, literary, theatrical, and cinematic traditions. Rather than defining romance by what it contains, we will instead consider what romance as a genre does. Through this approach, it becomes possible to examine why certain narratives were compelling enough to be transmitted across and preserved within a diverse range of cultures and historical periods. Texts include English translations of Sanskrit drama, a Hindi Sufi mystical work, an early Japanese novel, recent Bollywood cinema, Korean television melodramas, and the worldwide Harlequin Romance phenomenon. There are no prerequisites for this class. We will be covering a wide range of materials, and it is essential that students complete assigned readings before class and actively participate in class discussions. All are welcome in this class, regardless of age, race, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability, ethnicity, or religion. I ask that you keep an open mind towards the course materials and be tolerant and respectful of the opinions expressed by your fellow classmates.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • AS 229LEC Contemporary Asian Societies
    Lecture

    Introduces students to major features of societies in East, Southeast, and South Asia, and may incorporate material on Central and Southwest Asia depending on the instructor. Discusses the ways in which social scientists analyze contemporary societies and survey theories developed by social scientists to explain social phenomena in contemporary Asian societies.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 240SEM Women in Contemporary Asia
    Seminar

    Surveys contemporary issues for women in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Examines women's roles and opportunities in the process of development, including women of poor and working class households and women from middle class and professional backgrounds.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 252LEC Eastern Philosophy
    Lecture

    Examines selected views, traditions or issues in Chinese, Japanese, Indian or Southeast Asian philosophies.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 323LEC Gender in South Asian Literature
    Lecture

    This course will examine the different ways in which gender is constructed through South Asian literature, theatre, and film. It is intended to introduce students to the literature of South Asia, foregrounding the ways in which gender shapes different types, or genres, of text, and how different genres of text in turn shape notions of gender. Our task in this course will be to discover the cultural underpinnings of historical and contemporary conceptions of gender, sexuality, and love. Inasmuch as we play out our gender roles our social life, this course will also serve to introduce students to the ways in which performance is embedded in the public culture of South Asia. Throughout the semester, students will be required to apply the skills we acquire in our readings on theory to a broad set of materials, including authors from across the length and breadth of South Asia. There are no prerequisites for this class and all readings are in English.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 343LEC Indonesia: From Colonialism to Dictatorship
    Lecture

    The course examines Indonesian history from the beginnings of the nationalist movement in the early twentieth century, through the Japanese occupation during World War Two and the anti-colonial revolution that followed it. It then looks at the decline of constitutional democracy and the subsequent establishment of martial law, as well as the tragic killings in the mid-1960s that led to the rise of the 32-year long regime of President Suharto.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • AS 347LEC The Fantastical World of Japanese Anime
    Lecture

    In the past three decades Japanese popular culture has surpassed the technology industry to become Japans largest export. In particular, anime (Japanese animation), the most profitable form of Japanese popular culture, has become increasingly visible all over the world. Although anime fandom in the U.S. is anchored by several works of mass appeal, it remains a subculture whose increasingly influential devotees occupy a cultural fringe. This course introduces students to this unique subculture and introduces an academic approach to viewing the anime art form. In addition to the focus on specific genres of anime, this course will pay special attention to four influential anime directors; Oshii Mamoru, Satoshi Kon, Hosoda Mamoru and Miyazaki Hayao. This course is designed to be interactive, while it builds a rigorous understanding of the anime medium through its history, its artists, and its institutions. Not only will the course focus on critical analysis of films, it will use anime as a medium by which to study Japanese culture at large, with some attention given to production. Taught in English.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • AS 368LEC Modern Japan Since 1600
    Lecture

    Japan's emergence as a modern state. AAL

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 369LEC Korean History Up to 1800
    Lecture

    This course traces roughly two thousand years of Korean history, from tribal federations to the rise of early states that vied with one another for supremacy and the eventual establishment of political rule over the peninsula by a succession of dynastic states Silla, Kory, and Chos. The goal is to familiarize students with the major social, cultural, political, intellectual and religious developments in the Korean peninsula up to the start of the nineteenth century, while at the same time placing these historical developments within the wider regional context of Korean relations with China and Japan. For most of East Asian history, the people of Korea had more culturally extensive and historically significant contacts with its two neighbors than they had with each other. For this reason learning about Korean history provides a unique window onto pre-modern East Asia, and the history of these interconnections in turn reveals something important about the formation of a distinctive Korean identity. In addition to reading and being tested on primary and secondary sources on Korean history, students will be expected to demonstrate their ability to discuss and think critically about the material through written assignments.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 374LEC History of the Spread of Christianity in Asia
    Lecture

    This course traces the introduction and spread of Christianity in Asian history, focusing primarily on East Asia and giving special attention to Korea. It begins with an examination of Jesuit missions to Japan and China, as well as the role that India played in the establishment and maintenance of these missions. The different Jesuit strategies for accommodating or rejecting indigenous religious beliefs and customs are compared and considered, as well as the Nestorians in China much earlier. Then we turn to the unique way in which Catholicism was subsequently established in Korea, where Christianity has enjoyed unparalleled success in East Asia. We will look closely at how Christianity has affected and been affected by socio-political developments, its interactions with and influence upon traditional Asian religions, its relationship to nationalism since the late 19th century, and its tensions and conflict with colonialism and Communism in the 20th century. It concludes by asking what factors might have enabled Christianity to have such success in Korea (and the Philippines) and compare these to the situation in China and Japan.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • AS 375LEC The U.S. and East Asia
    Lecture

    A survey of relations between the U.S. and East Asia from the eighteenth century to the present.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 383LEC Travel Writing in Asia
    Lecture

    The idea of India has long attracted the attention of people from afar. Whether in search of gold or enlightenment, the India carried in the traveler's imagination often conflicts with the India that is actually encountered. This course is intended to serve not just as an introduction to the motivations and experiences of travelers to India, but also to the forms of knowledge that are produced in the wake of such travels. We will begin by examining the accounts of early Greek ambassadors and sailors and Chinese pilgrims seeking wealth and knowledge. Both Muslim and Christian adventurers produced travelogues that describe the marvels of India in the medieval period. The Mughal court fascinated Europeans sojourners, while Indian travelers were in turn both delighted and disgusted by what they observed in Europe. Hippies more recently and in their own way reenact quests by colonial British officials for the sublime and picturesque. The diversity of perspectives that these works present challenges readers to consider what it means to be an outsider looking in on a culture, compelling us to consider arguments for and against treating certain geographic and political regions and temporal periods as coherent cultural zones. By reading and discussing a wide range of both primary and secondary source materials, students will develop a broad familiarity with the history, literatures, religions, and geography of South Asia. All of the readings are in English and no background in South Asian languages, history, or literature is expected.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 389LEC Pirates, Drifters, Fishers: Maritime Southeast Asia
    Lecture

    This course examines key moments and longer-term dynamics of Southeast Asia's maritime history. We will consider how the sea affected state-building from its earliest days, its impact on pre-colonial international relations, its role as a conduit of the desire for conquest and for exotic goods, and the question of piracy, past and present.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • AS 391LEC China and the World
    Lecture

    Survey of Chinese views of the world order, exchanges in material culture across China's borders, and the ways in which Chinese governments and people have interacted with the world from the imperial era to the present era of the rise of China.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 392LEC Asian Religions
    Lecture

    Provides an overview of the major religions of Asia (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam) in the light of their sacred texts, and focuses on the theological underpinnings, stories, and practices of each tradition. This course fosters a better understanding of religion in general, and familiarity with the spiritual values that shape everyday lives in many different locales worldwide.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 393LEC Topics in Asian Studies
    Lecture

    Varying topics in Asian studies, chosen by the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 394LEC Topics in Asian Studies
    Lecture

    Varying topics in Asian studies, chosen by the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 395LEC Topics in Asian Studies
    Lecture

    Varying topics in Asian studies, chosen by the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 396LEC Topics in Asian American Studies
    Lecture

    Varying topics in Asian American studies, chosen by the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 397LEC Topics in Asian American Studies
    Lecture

    Varying topics in Asian American studies, chosen by the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 398LEC Topics in Asian American Studies
    Lecture

    Varying topics in Asian American studies, chosen by the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 401LEC Buddhism
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 410LEC Communication in Asia and Pacific Rim Countries
    Lecture

    Provides students with knowledge of communication and its related issues in East Asian and Pacific Rim countries, which are going to be the world's focal point for economy and politics in the next century.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 411LEC 4th Sem Classical Tibetan
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 422LEC Japanese Language and Culture
    Lecture

    This course explores topics related to language and society, and intercultural communication, and provides students with opportunities to address questions concerning these topics. The primary goal of this course is to enhance students' knowledge of intercultural and sociolinguistic aspects that contribute to the property and use of the Japanese language. Although this course is appropriate for students of Japanese and/or linguistics, the course is appropriate for students who have a serious interest in issues of language, society, and communication, and their relationship. Prior knowledge of Japanese is not required and English translation is provided for Japanese language data used for discussions and analyses. Taught in English.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 423LEC Korean Language and Culture
    Lecture

    Introduces Korean culture and society, including readings and discussions of Korean history, politics, economy, art, literature, and language. Taught in English.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 431LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • AS 446SEM Islam and Literature
    Seminar

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to the wide variety of poetic and prose literary forms associated with Islam, including contemporary English-language novels and translations from Arabic, Bengali, Persian, Tamil, and Urdu originals. We will explore literature through a variety of themes and genres common to the literary traditions of these languages. This will serve to frame larger questions central to the study of Islamicate literatures including: * how notions of modernity and secularism have been formulated to exclude those outside Euro-American literary traditions; * the persistence of structuralist approaches to nonwestern literatures; * the literary antecedents of so-called magical realist depictions of Islamicate societies; * formalist and historicist approaches to pre-print literatures, and related debates regarding the origins of literary representations of selfhood outside the West; * issues of canonicity, core and periphery, heterodoxy, orality and literacy, print and manuscript cultures, and Sheldon Pollock's cosmopolitan and vernacular literatures; * what literary forms of ambiguity and irony reveal about genre, modes of education, and the critical apparatus available to readers; and * 20th-century modernist and Marxist reorientations of classical literary tropes. Theoretical readings will be paired each week with primary source literary materials. All readings are in English and will include early Sufi mystical works, pre-Islamic, medieval, and more recent 20th-century poetry, and such prose genres as commentaries, folktales, romances, short stories, and novels. All of the texts are in English and no background in other languages or Islam is expected.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 454LEC Chinese Philosophy
    Lecture

    Examines selected views, traditions or issues in Chinese philosophy.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • AS 496TUT Asian Studies Internship
    Tutorial

    Credits: 1 - 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • AS 498TUT Senior Research in Asian Studies
    Tutorial

    A capstone course required for all majors in Asian Studies. Research, writing, and oral presentation of project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • AS 499TUT Independent Study
    Tutorial

    Credits: 1 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Published: October 17, 2017 03:21:02 PM