2017-18
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Classics (CL)

Classics

338 Millard Fillmore Academic Core, Ellicott Complex
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14261-0026
Ph: 716-645-0466
F: 716-645-2225
W: www.classics.buffalo.edu
Roger Woodard
Chair
David Teegarden
Director of Undergraduate Studies

The Learning Environment

The department of Classics offers lecture courses on the archaeology, culture, history, and literature of ancient Greece and Rome, and smaller language classes (in Latin and ancient Greek) that emphasize class participation. Majors must complete a capstone class that draws upon all of the conceptual and analytical skills that they acquired while a major.

About Our Facilities

The department of Classics is housed in the Millard Fillmore Academic Center. Classics courses are held in the department’s seminar room and in classrooms located both in MFAC and on the Academic Spine of the North Campus. Instructors in lecture classes use technology to make the ancient Mediterranean world more concrete and vivid.

About Our Faculty

Rated nineteenth in the country in a recent survey of classics departments, the UB Department of Classics faculty regularly devotes some or all of their time to undergraduate teaching. Among them is the holder of the Andrew V.V. Raymond Professorship in Classics and past winners of the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching. Members of the faculty have also held the office of President in both the American Philological Association and the Archaeological Institute of America, the two primary professional organizations for classicists in North America. The department also serves as home to the journal Arethusa, an internationally recognized periodical devoted to the publication of scholarship in classical studies. Other editorial affiliations by members of the faculty have included positions with American Journal of Archaeology and Classical World. The department allows advanced graduate students to teach select classes.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit the Classics department website for additional information about our faculty.

CL Courses


  • CL 100LEC Archaeology and Rediscovery in the Classical World
    Lecture

    This course examines (1) the search for the evidence for ancient Greek and Roman culture that survived antiquity; and (2) what that evidence reveals of those cultures. Notable archaeological finds such as those of the Athenian Acropolis and Agora and the south Italian cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, among numerous others, will be explored, alongside Renaissance (and later) rediscoveries of what the Greeks and Romans had to say about their times and places.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 105LEC Greek & Roman Archaeology
    Lecture

    A broad introduction to the archaeology of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age to the collapse of the Roman Empire. Gives particular emphasis to examining how archaeologists go about posing and answering questions.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 110LEC The Latest News from the Ancient World
    Lecture

    This course will look at several ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds, examining the many different methods we use to learn about the past and learning how a multitude of modern institutions and ideas are rooted in early antiquity from religious and philosophical ideologies to social institutions to artistic and architectural forms. We will also look at many ways in which we now use the past when we are talking about the present, for example in films and literature, in political and social debates. Our focus will be on the ancient Mediterranean and Near East, and we will examine material from the early Paleolithic era up into the Byzantine and Islamic eras. Throughout the course, you will be encouraged to reflect on connections between the distant past and our contemporary world, using the past to better understand the present, and using the present to make better sense of the past.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 112LEC Stone Axe to Tank: Warfare in World History
    Lecture

    This is an entry level course for those wishing to study the place of warfare in history, from the Neolithic Era to World War One. The course will consist of weekly lectures, which will include numerous images and film clips on such topics as fortifications, changes in technology, tactics, and strategy, military fashion, and the uses of geography, as well as weekly recitations for discussion.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 113LEC Myth and Religion in the Ancient World
    Lecture

    Provides an introduction to the mythology of the Greeks and Romans. In addition to considering the myths themselves, we study how they have been employed by ancient through contemporary cultures as reflected in areas ranging from religious and social practice to works of art and architecture.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • CL 151LEC Medical Terminology
    Lecture

    History and structure of scientific terminology; the use of Latin and Greek roots in formation of technical terms in zoology, botany, and medicine.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • CL 180LEC Ancient Sport
    Lecture

    Based on material in translation, the culture of competition in the ancient world: funeral games, celebrating the winners, tragedy, the Olympics and other Greek games, the gymnasium, Roman gladiators, education in Rome, emperors and Roman games, reaction against Roman sport.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • CL 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • CL 200LEC Intro Classical Archeology
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 202LEC Archaeology and Rediscovery of the Ancient World
    Lecture

    Introduces the material world of Greece and Rome through the study of great archaeological discoveries and archaeologists from the renaissance to the present. Relates the archaeologists and their discoveries to the general development of classical archaeology and the cultural history of the era in which they took place.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 205LEC Heroes
    Lecture

    The archetype of the hero as it occurs in the psychology of the life cycle, in ancient heroic literature, and in modern popular culture. Readings from Gilgamesh, the Odyssey, the Mahabharata, Beowulf, the Arthurian cycle, and the Bible. Examples from cinema, comic books, etc.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: Completion of Communication Literacy 1 or completion of Writing Skills 1 (ENG 101 or placement into ENG 201)
  • CL 209SEM Writing Across the Curriculum: Classics
    Seminar

    CL 209 Writing Across the Curriculum: Classics is designed to aid majors in extending the writing skills they began to acquire in CL1 within the context of the classical literature as well as preparing them to work within the wide field of classical literary genres. The texts will include epic and lyric poetry, history, rhetoric, letters, philosophy, and drama, both tragic and comic. Students will explore such topics as translation theory, the beginnings of historical writing, and the ancient art of persuasion through a series of 5-7-page papers, weekly on-line critical responses, and a final in-class presentation in the context of a mini-conference.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: Completion of Communication Literacy 1 or completion of Writing Skills 1 (ENG 101 or placement into ENG 201)
  • CL 210LEC Women in the Ancient World
    Lecture

    Explores status of women; roles in literature; their social and economic context; and the origins of contemporary stereotypes and prejudices.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 212LEC Survey of Greek History
    Lecture

    Introduces the political, military, intellectual, and social history of ancient Greece, from the neolithic beginnings to the eastern conquests of Alexander in the fourth century B.C.E.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 222LEC Greek Civilization
    Lecture

    Elements of Greek civilization analyzed from synchronistic and developmental views to produce a coherent image of that culture as a living and expanding entity.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 223LEC Roman Civilization
    Lecture

    Survey of Rome's mythical beginnings to the time of the emperors that covers the full spectrum of Roman cultural expression. Topics covered are not only literature, painting, sculpture, and architecture but also details of everyday life in the Roman world, as well as the roles played by marginal figures (women, slaves, foreigners).

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 228LEC Warfare in the Ancient World
    Lecture

    Warfare has been a constant feature of societies and civilizations. Provides a historically anchored survey of warfare in the ancient Mediterranean civilizations, particularly those of Greece and Rome. Not simply a history of strategies and battles, our intent is to look at the wide range of issues influencing and impacted by armed conflict.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 250LEC Roman Religion
    Lecture

    Religion played a major role in the daily life of ancient Romans. This course examines the pervasive role of religion and ritual in all aspects of Roman society from the early Republic to Late Antiquity. After considering the gods, mythology, origins and nature of Roman religion, the course will turn to the relationship between religion and politics (public and provincial religion, priests, emperor worship, forbidden cults and persecutions), ritual activities (sacrifices, votive offerings, prayers, funerals), religious innovations (the mystery religions, Christianity), and the nature of personal religion and superstition (rites of passage, magic, curses and amulets). These topics will be illustrated by relevant texts (manuscripts, papyri and inscriptions) archaeological evidence (temples, shrines, grave markers, burials and grave goods) and Roman religious art (religious symbolism, cult images, catacomb paintings). Students will be confronted by a society in which the boundaries of religious and secular are often blurred or impossible to determine.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 262LEC Art & Archeology of Egypt
    Lecture

    This course will explore through archaeology and the monuments the development of Ancient Egypt from the first settlement along the Nile to the Roman Conquest. Foci will include the origins of the centralized state, art and society in the Age of the Pyramids, the changing world of Middle Kingdom Egypt, the creation of an Egyptian Empire, and the collapse and conquest of Pharaonic Egypt. The evidence from archaeology will be integrated with the rich surviving literary evidence and efforts made to relate Egypt to the develop of other pre-industrial civilizations.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 287LEC The Art & Archaeology of Greece
    Lecture

    This course will survey the art and archaeology of Greece from the early Bronze Age (3rd millennium BCE) down through the Hellenistic era (3rd-1st centuries BCE), integrating lectures and textbook assignments with site visits and museum visits around the Greek mainland and islands.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 300LEC Mesopotamian Archaeology
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 302LEC Archaeology of Assyria
    Lecture

    Traces the history and development of ancient Assyrians' culture; helps students see how individual strains of different cultures - the variegated peoples that make up the ancestry and contemporaries of the historical Assyrians - can be reworked by these ancient peoples to create (or force the creation of) a sense of common heritage; introduces the specific character of the Assyrian Palace and its bureaucracy; improves student skills in analyzing both written text and the visual record of an ancient culture for the purpose of writing history.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 305LEC Greek Intellectual History
    Lecture

    Introduces the development of Greek intellectual life in myth, literature, philosophy, and political thought.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 315LEC Epic in Translation
    Lecture

    Readings in translation designed to provide an understanding of the forms and particular visions of the epic genre, especially its Greek and Roman exemplars.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 316LEC Greek Drama in Translation
    Lecture

    Studies the major dramatic works of Greece (in English translation), the historical, philosophical, and cultural background of Greek drama, as well as its subsequent influence on Western theatre.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 327LEC History of Roman Republic
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 328LEC History of Roman Empire
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 331LEC Roman Imperialism
    Lecture

    The Roman Empire lasted over 600 years, occupying most of Western Europe, much of the Middle East, Asia Minor and the northern coast of Africa. It must be considered the most successful empire in western history. Its impact can still be found in the geography, language, institutions, customs and culture of modern western society. What made the Roman Empire so great? What challenges did it face, and how did it overcome them? This course will explore how the Roman Empire formed, maintained control, the nature of its seemingly invincible army, the defense of its borders, how it dealt with rebellions and resistance, and what strategies it used to integrate its many and ethnically diverse inhabitants.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 332LEC The Athenian Empire
    Lecture

    Athenian Empire of the fifth century B.C.E.; consequences of its policies toward Sparta and Persia.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 333LR The Ancient World in the Movies
    Lecture

    A study of several modern movies about the ancient Greco-Roman world. During the semester, we will explore different aspects of classical culture (historical events, religious behavior, social issues, etc.) and different modern issues embedded in the films we watch. Students will gain an appreciation for cultural and historical issues of Classical antiquity, for the history of modern cinema, and for the many ways in which movies reflect the eras in which they were made.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • CL 336LEC Introduction to Greek Archaeology I
    Lecture

    Remains of the Aegean littoral and their relation to the more advanced civilizations of the Near East, from earliest beginnings to ca. 700 B.C.E.; emphasizes advanced Bronze Age civilizations of Crete and Mycenae.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 337LEC Introduction to Greek Archaeology II
    Lecture

    Surveys architecture, sculpture, and painting from ca. 700 B.C.E. to ca. 350 B.C.E. Traces the development of artistic types, towns, and sanctuaries against the setting of the history, political institutions, and public figures of the times.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 338LEC Introduction to Roman Archaeology I
    Lecture

    Traces the development of Italic culture (early Iron Age, Etruscan, and during the Roman Republic) via avenues ranging from burial practices to urbanism.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 339LEC Introduction to Roman Archaeology II
    Lecture

    Focuses on the Roman Empire from Augustus (d. A.D. 14) to Constantine (d. A.D. 337), considering art, architecture, and archaeology both at home and in the far-flung provinces.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 340LEC The Classical Origins of Western Literature
    Lecture

    The poets and writers of ancient Greece and Rome created countless innovations in their literary works that became the inheritance of Western culture. These range from narrative techniques like flashbacks, found already in Homer, to the creation of meaning through sustained allegory, to the development of genres and tones like the macabre. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the range of classical literature by surveying key innovations that continue to make Greek and Roman literature exciting, and that have influenced the work of centuries of writers in the Western tradition down to the present. Students will read selections from early modern and modern writers alongside those of classical authors to consider how these later authors directly or indirectly build upon, adapt, and even abandon the techniques and themes of classical authors. We will consider not only how later authors developed classical modes and methods, but equally how the perspectives of later authors can help us isolate what is interesting and perhaps unexpected in the work of classical authors. The class will include comparisons with Arabic and Chinese poetics to provide additional perspectives on the Western literature. This course satisfies the SUNY General Education Requirement in Humanities and Western Civilization.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 381LEC Alexander the Great
    Lecture

    Examines the life and world of Alexander the Great, beginning with his father, Philip, and concluding with the division of his kingdom among his lieutenants. Analyzes the sources, both literary and archaeological, for Alexander's life.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 391LEC Art & Archaeology of Rome
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 408SEM End of Rome & Birth of Europe
    Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 410LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary by semester. See department for course description.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 422LEC The Greek City
    Lecture

    History of the Greek city as a political and social institution with attention to physical environment, economic and agricultural resources, use of urban space, public architecture, and representations of civic ideology.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 423LEC Religion and Society in Ancient Greece
    Lecture

    Analyzes the role of religion in the ancient Greek polis with attention to the archaeological evidence for cult practice, the representation of ritual acts in Greek literature, gender difference and religious ideology, and the ritual of life cycle.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • CL 430LEC Ancient Economy
    Lecture

    Examines in depth the nature of economic activity in the Greco-Roman world. Places particular emphasis on the employment of general models to understand the ancient economy, and how textual and archaeological evidence has been used to develop and evaluate these models.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 440LEC Pompeii
    Lecture

    Systematic survey of the archaeological remains of the buried city of Pompeii. Uses the unique evidence offered by Pompeii to examine the nature of municipal life in Roman Italy, including society, economy, politics, and private life.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 491LEC Sanskrit 1
    Lecture

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 492LEC Sanskrit 2
    Lecture

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • CL 494SEM Classics Capstone
    Seminar

    The Classics Capstone is a required and crucial component of the coursework for a Classics major and is recommended for a Classics minor. While the topic of exploration will vary from term to term, the course will consistently provide the Classics student with the opportunity to integrate all elements of her/his prior preparation in the discipline (linguistic and literary, historical, cultural), in such a way as to engage synthetically phenomena of Classical antiquity at a high level of intellectual discussion and writing.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Prerequisites: CL Majors, Minors or P.I
  • CL 498TUT Undergraduate Research
    Tutorial

    Students collaborate with faculty research mentors on an ongoing faculty research project or conduct independent research under the guidance of a faculty member.

    Credits: 1 - 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • CL 499TUT Independent Study
    Tutorial

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
Published: November 16, 2017 08:32:43 AM