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Environment and Sustainability (EVS)

EVS Courses

  • The Learning Environment

    The Learning Environment

    Courses are taught in both large lecture, small seminar and field course formats. Prerequisite and introductory courses for the major typically enroll 40-200 students per class. Core courses and upper level track courses enroll 35 to 100 students per class.

    About Our Facilities

    The Department of Environment and Sustainability is housed in Clemens Hall on UB’s north campus. The department holds classes in centrally scheduled space throughout the campus, which includes traditional classrooms and lecture halls that can accommodate the program’s teaching philosophies.

    About Our Faculty

    Students take courses from faculty in the Department of Environment and Sustainability as well as faculty from across the College of Arts and Sciences allowing them to also interact with faculty from departments such as geography, geology, biology, and sociology. Instruction or grading responsibilities for some of these courses may be assigned to teaching assistants.

    Faculty List Directory

    Please visit the Faculty Directory on the Department of Environment and Sustainability website for additional information about our faculty.

  • EVS 118LEC Introduction to Environmental and Sustainability Studies
    Lecture

    Involves an interdisciplinary approach to social-ecological issues. Explores ecological concepts, human environment, air and water pollution, pesticides, solid waste handling, mineral and energy resources, the nuclear fuel cycle, population and food resources, and environmental control toward developing sustainable human and natural systems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • EVS 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • EVS 217LEC Environmental Chemistry: Principles and Applications
    Lecture

    For Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Environmental Science students; designed to show how chemistry is involved in the identification, analysis, and solution of a large array of environmental problems. Relates basic chemistry to the atmosphere, the ozone layer, global warming, greenhouse gasses, energy production and emissions, water quality and pollution, acid precipitation, nuclear power and waste, nutrition, hydrology, and hazardous wastes.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 220LEC Environmental History
    Lecture

    This course will explore how people have related to the environment throughout history. The first part of the course will focus on the most revolutionary changes in world environmental history, from the invention of agriculture to the rise of consumer culture. The second part of the course will look at the history of efforts to solve environmental problems. We will end by considering what history can teach us about the challenge of climate change.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 238LEC Science, Religion, and Nature
    Lecture

    This environmental philosophy course explores the impact of religious traditions and modern science upon our perceptions of nature and how these perceptions ultimately determine our relationship with one another and the world in which we live. Specific areas of focus include nature attunement/magic, mythology, western mysticism, eastern religions, shamanistic traditions, Gaia theory and concepts of Spirit and nature.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 309LEC Ecology
    Lecture

    Processes that control the abundance and distribution of organisms in their natural environments; emphasizing population, community and evolutionary ecology. This course is the same as BIO 309, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: BIO 200 or GLY 315 or Engineering and Applied Sciences Bachelor - Environmental Engineering.
  • EVS 310LLB Ecological Methods
    Laboratory

    Field exercises to illustrate major concepts of modern ecology, and the techniques and procedures used in ecological research. This course is the same as BIO 310, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Corequisites: GLY 309 or BIO 309.
    Other Requisites: Pre- or
  • EVS 315LEC Field Ecology
    Lecture

    This is a field oriented course that explores the interrelationships of life with one another and their relationships with the environment that supports them. Classes are conducted both on and off campus and are focused in the areas of environmental analysis, conservation biology and general ecology. Specific class topics range from Wildlife Ecology, Botanical Surveys and Resource Management to varied Habitat Studies, Field Geology and Herbalism.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • EVS 317LEC The Politics of Sustainability
    Lecture

    Focuses on the relationship between environmental problems and the political process. Explores definitions of an environmentally sustainable society. Then we attempt to answer the question of "how to get there from here." This involves developing a theory of social change by examining a number of case studies. We also study local environmental controversies from a political perspective through firsthand involvement or guest speakers. We also look at national and international environmental conflicts, such as the backlash against mainstream environmentalism created by the "Wise Use" movement and contemporary political forces championing property rights and states' rights.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 321LEC The Environmental Impact of War
    Lecture

    This course focuses on the physical, chemical and biological effects that war and political conflict have on the environment. Topics will include ancient, historical and contemporary case studies and will span the globe. Examples include: the American conflict in Vietnam, deforestation, munitions pollution, Iraqi oilfields, and Sherman¿s March to the Sea.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 326SEM Great Lakes Ecology
    Seminar

    The Great Lakes hold nearly 20% of all the available fresh water on the planet. They provide drinking water, hydroelectricity, and both economic and recreational opportunities to millions who live around their shores. This class provides an understanding of the Great Lakes, from their formation to the important role they play in the political and ecological systems of North America. Focuses on historical and ecological aspects, as well as current political and policy issues surrounding the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence ecosystem. Students learn about the geology, biota, ecology, management, and social and political aspects of the Great Lakes, especially the lower lakes (Erie and Ontario). The course uses a multi-faceted ecosystem approach to diverse topics involved with understanding these complex ecological systems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 330LEC Sustainability and Community
    Lecture

    This course looks at how communities play a role in environmental change. How does a community's actions develop into protection of environmental resources? Students will study how rural, urban and global communities, environmental issues differ and in what ways they are similar. How do different communities learn from each other and adapt the actions and methods used to the differing needs and circumstances of their own communities? In addition to looking at how communities address such issues as degraded water quality and hazardous waste dumps, it will also look at how to develop sustainable solutions through policies that promote green codes for government/community buildings, urban farming and the development of alternative energy industries (e.g. wind and solar farms).

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 345LEC Water & Society
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 348SEM Local Environmental Problems
    Seminar

    Overview of major environmental problems , with emphasis on the Western New York area. Examples of problems and solutions are explored.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 350LEC Water Quality
    Lecture

    Technical aspects of control of environmental waste; ways in which wastes are generated and their effects on the environment in municipal, rural and global waterways.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 351LEC Air Quality
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 360SEM Environmental Impact Statements and Resource Management
    Seminar

    Examines the objectives, development, and preparation, of EIS in response to federal/state laws and regulations. Explores the environmental impact assessment process as it relates to the protection and potential impact of natural, cultural and economic resources.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 385LEC Energy, Environment, and Society
    Lecture

    Focuses on the relationship between energy use and the associated impact on the environment and society. Explores our dependence upon traditional energy resources such as oil, coal, nuclear and natural gas as well as renewable energy resources such as geothermal, wind, solar, etc. Examines solutions to the difficult process of changing current energy consumption trends.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 409LEC Advanced Ecology
    Lecture

    Advanced course in the foundations of ecology emphasizing population and community ecology. Supplements lectures on basic ecological principles and models with discussions of both current and historically important issues. This course is the same as BIO 407 and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: EVS 309 or BIO 309 or EVS 411 or BIO 338.
  • EVS 410LEC Hazardous Waste Management
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 411LEC Marine Ecology
    Lecture

    Surveys tropical marine ecosystems, with an emphasis on coral reef communities. Examines processes controlling abundance and distribution of marine taxa using primary literature. This course is the same as BIO 411, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: BIO 309 or EVS 309 or GLY 315 or BIO 338.
  • EVS 412LAB Field Course in Tropical Marine Ecology
    Laboratory

    An intensive two week field course in the Bahamas focusing on coral reef communities. Combining lectures, fieldwork, and laboratory analyses, students conduct in depth studies of Caribbean marine habitats.

    Credits: 2
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Summer
    Prerequisites: GLY 411 or BIO 411 or GLY 309 or BIO 309, or GLY 315 or BIO 338.
    Corequisites: Must enroll in GLY 412 or BIO 412 LEC and LAB in the same term.
  • EVS 412LEC Field Course in Tropical Marine Ecology
    Lecture

    An intensive two week field course in the Bahamas focusing on coral reef communities. Combining lectures, fieldwork, and laboratory analyses, students conduct in depth studies of Caribbean marine habitats. This course is the same as BIO 412 and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Summer
    Prerequisites: GLY 411 or BIO 411 or GLY 309 or BIO 309, or GLY 315 or BIO 338.
    Corequisites: Must enroll in GLY 412 or BIO 412 LEC and LAB in the same term.
  • EVS 417LEC Sustainability and American Culture
    Lecture

    How have the social sciences (sociology, anthropology, politics, economics, and public policy) and the humanities (literature, religion, history, film, critical theory, ethics, philosophy and educational theory) shaped, and been shaped by, the growing field of sustainability? How do these disciplines integrate with the natural sciences to help solve complex sustainability problems today? This class features guest speakers and historical and contemporary work by important American authors, artists, thinkers and educators who continue to influence our understanding and application of interdisciplinary knowledge in sustainability discourse. This course is dual-listed with EVS 517.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 418SEM Environmental Problems
    Seminar

    Focuses on understanding and dealing with complex, 21st-century socio-ecological problems such as climate change, biodiversity loss, exponential population growth, diminishing water sources, homogenized agricultural systems, depleting rain forests, non-point source pollution, the irreversible conversion of environmental resources into disposable commodities, and more. Emphasizes the role of the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities in solving these local-to-global environmental issues.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 419SEM Wilderness
    Seminar

    Focuses on wilderness and biocentrism. Explores the idea of wilderness along three pathways. Part 1 deals with the history of biological wilderness and philosophical wilderness from Spinoza to Leopold to Snyder. Part 2 covers biological and other wilderness qualities. Part 3 examines the social movements related to wilderness and biocentrism. Also explores environmental ethics and morals. Investigates proposals for wilderness restoration, preservation, and expansion. A close examination of indigenous cultures' wilderness beliefs accompanies our study.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 424SEM Environmental Sustainability in Practice
    Seminar

    This course engages with sustainability using an interdisciplinary approach and focuses specifically on local issues and practices. Through a combination of active engagement with course materials, class discussions, site visits and writing assignments, students will interact with sustainability through relevant ecological scenarios, local and international policies, social activism, and economic practices.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 433SEM Topics in Environmental Studies
    Seminar

    Allows students to explore up-to-date information and current debates in their chosen field. Topic titles and offerings vary from semester to semester. Students should check with the Department of Environment and Sustainability to determine how the course may be used to fulfill major requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 441LEC Wildlife and Wildlands Management
    Lecture

    Wildlife and Wildlands Management will focus on the application of ecological principles to studying and managing wildlife populations with emphasis on habitat management. This course serves as an introduction to wildlife ecology and management and focuses on the wildlife of North America. The course begins with a brief examination of the history of wildlife management and wildlife policy in North America. The majority of the class will focus on important wildlife species, wildlife ecology, population biology, and other subjects of importance to wildlife management. Special problems such as endangered species preservation, genetic diversity conservation, predator management, control of nuisance and alien species, and other non-game species will be covered. We will discuss case histories and current issues of wildlife management on public and private lands. Science, of which wildlife conservation is a part, allows us to understand how living systems function. This knowledge further allows us to determine our role in maintaining healthy ecosystems. We also consider the attitudes of humans toward wildlife and their demands and impacts on North America's wildlife resources.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 442SEM Environmental Movements
    Seminar

    This course offers a comprehensive analysis of efforts to protect the environment in the United States. Though Americans have addressed many environmental problems, we still face serious challenges. By analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of environmental activism so far, this course will provide insights into possible next steps for the movement. This course will give special attention to the activism of young people, the role of scientists in shaping environmental debate, the movement to "green" the business world, and the struggle for environmental justice.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 445LEC Restoration Ecology
    Lecture

    Restoration ecology is the art and science of repairing lands that have become damaged by natural or human disturbance. Examines ecological and social reasons for restoration. Focuses on how to identify and repair the key physical, chemical and biotic components of damaged ecosystems. Case studies and a field trip help are used to develop the theories and methods.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 356 or BIO 309 or EVS 309.
  • EVS 448LEC Animals, Zoos, and Ecology
    Lecture

    Introduces the study of animal behavior. Explores natural behaviors and the factors affecting those behaviors by covering such topics as the evolution of behavior, the nervous and endocrine systems, biological rhythms, social systems, reproductive behavior, and more. Course participants examine and understand animal behavior through lectures, readings, short projects, and direct observation of the animal populations on zoo grounds.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 452LAB Limnology
    Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 452LEC Limnology
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • EVS 459SEM Human Impacts On Ancient Environments
    Seminar

    This course explores the pre- and protohistoric record of human-environment interaction, as well as current traditional environmental knowledge (TEK). Scholars once imagined such relationships as unchanging and predictable, focusing on humans as victims or destroyers. Today, research examines socio-natural systems as complex interactions between the non-living world and living creatures, and between humans and other organisms. Modern ecosystems are historically contingent and represent centuries or millennia of human-environment interactions. Course material focuses on archaeological, historical and interdisciplinary examples of problems and solutions to environment-related conditions. This course is dual-listed with APY 729. This course is the same as APY 459 and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • EVS 460SEM Leadership in Sustainability
    Seminar

    This course aims to inspire and enable people to lead the effective change towards environmental sustainability and is designed to empower and prepare anyone to join in the collective effort to steer our society back on course towards a just and sustainable future. It is created to enhance individual leadership skills as applied to a variety of organizational contexts (education, government, non-profit, church, community, business, etc.). The course explores what leadership in sustainability is and guides students to advance their related capabilities, competencies, and strategies. The personal, interpersonal, organizational and infrastructural dimensions of leadership in sustainability are each addressed. A variety of specific case studies and examples of sustainability in practice, including everything from urban green and blue spaces to environmental purchasing are explored. Interdependencies between finance, politics, interpersonal relationships, cognitive processes, capacity building, and technology are discussed. Students taking the course for credit in the Department of Environment and Sustainability, or any other department or major, as well as professionals, will leave with a deeper knowledge of leadership in sustainability as they are required to complete a project involving a real-life or fictitious leadership of their choice.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • EVS 463LEC Soil Ecology
    Lecture

    Soil is a vast reservoir for a wide diversity of organisms. Plant roots explore this diversity daily. Various other animals consume smaller creatures either intentionally or unintentionally by foraging on plant roots, insects, and microorganisms. Soil ecology is the study of how these soil organisms interact with other organisms and their environment ¿ their influence on and response to numerous soil processes and properties form the basis for delivering essential ecosystem services. Some of the key processes in soil are nutrient cycling, soil aggregate formation, and biodiversity interactions. The diversity and abundance of soil life exceeds that of any other ecosystem. Plant establishment, competitiveness, and growth is governed largely by the ecology below ground, so understanding this system is an essential component of plant sciences and terrestrial ecology. This course is dual listed with EVS 563.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: EVS 309.
  • EVS 472LEC Tropical Environments
    Lecture

    This course will provide students with a general overview of the ecology, geology and climatology of the tropics from a systems perspective. It will focus on the physical and biological processes of the area and how humans have changed it. Marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments will be covered. Geographic areas of discussion will include the neotropics, Southeast Asia, Africa and the South Pacific.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • EVS 479LAB Environmental Education Field Studies
    Laboratory

    This course is designed to prepare students as environmental educators and field ecologists. Students will experience a series of lectures and fieldwork in the areas of environmental education teaching strategies and techniques, outdoor games and activities, curriculum development and field ecology studies. Students will also have an opportunity to participate in a teacher training program through a variety of youth ecology camps with a local environmental education organization.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Summer
  • EVS 489LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Special topics courses are offered to allow students to explore topics not in the standard curriculum. Topic titles and content vary from semester to semester. Check with the department or the class schedule for current offerings. This course is dual listed with EVS 589.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • EVS 493LAB Ecology of Unique Environments
    Laboratory

    This course is focused upon week-long field ecology studies at unique and threatened environments throughout the United States. Participants will experience a wide variety of interpretive programs regarding the history, ecology and politics of these environments. At present, these expeditions are conducted during the Winter in the Florida Everglades and in the Summer to either the Adirondack Mountains of New York or Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring, Summer
  • EVS 496TUT Environmental Internship
    Tutorial

    The Environmental Internship, offered during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters, provides students with professional experiences in the areas of Environmental Policy, Education, Resources, and Sustainability. This course, administered through the Department of Environment and Sustainability, coordinates intern placements with governmental, non-profit and corporate organizations in Western New York and beyond. Through this internship, students gain invaluable on-the-job experience and gain further insight into personal areas of focus and professional opportunities.

    Credits: 1 - 6
    Grading: Pass/Not Pass (PNP)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • EVS 498LEC Undergraduate Research
    Lecture

    Students work with faculty on an ongoing project. Students can also conduct independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Students should contact faculty members with which they wish to work to learn about possible projects.

    Credits: 1 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • EVS 499TUT Independent Study
    Tutorial

    EVS students may pursue topics of their choice with faculty members who agree to work with them. Students should contact a faculty member directly and explore topics and scope of project.

    Credits: 1 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
 
Published: Oct 13, 2020 13:33:28