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Environmental Design (END)

Department of Urban and Regional Planning

126 Hayes Hall
South Campus
Buffalo, NY 14214-8030

Daniel B. Hess
Professor and Chair of Urban Planning

Norma Everett
Graduate Program Administrator

R. J. Multari
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education and Adjunct Assistant Professor

Christina Krawczyk
Academic Advisor

Associated Programs

Associated Subjects

END Courses

  • The Learning Environment

    The Learning Environment

    Environmental designers plan and develop physical environments with which people interact every day. Direct, tangible engagement with the environment – whether it be neighborhoods, communities, urban streetscapes, or citizen activists – is fundamental to the aspiring environmental designer. University at Buffalo Environmental Design is distinctive by engaging our students in the dynamic binational Buffalo-Niagara region. In Environmental Design, students become involved with municipal governments and neighborhood groups, urban and rural environments, citizens and leaders, and the challenges they face: both complex problems and creative opportunities. This is done through in-class exercises, site visits, field work, internships and independent study, capstone courses, and through Environmental Design studio workshops. Through Environmental Design, we prepare students for careers in which they can make positive change in communities.

    About Our Facilities

    The School of Architecture and Planning's historic home in Hayes Hall reopened in 2016 after a $45 million restoration that has revived an iconic landmark for UB and created a flexible, dynamic learning environment for future architects, developers, environmental designers, preservationists, and urban planners.

    The Architecture and Planning Library, located in Abbot Hall, is one of ten libraries within the University at Buffalo.

    University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning IT Services comprise two sets of facilities: a central collection of laboratories and computing classrooms, and a collection of distributed facilities located in the graduate and undergraduate architecture and urban planning studios.

    The Digital Fabrication Workshop, one of the premier fabrication facilities in the Buffalo Niagara region, is the hub of our learning-through-making curriculum. Equipped for fabrication of all types, the shop serves both as a space to execute coursework and as a think-tank and makerspace for collaborative research with practice and industry.

    About Our Faculty

    Senior faculty from University at Buffalo Urban and Regional Planning teach core courses in the undergraduate pre-professional environmental design program. Faculty from Urban and Regional Planning have been recognized with the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching. In addition, some courses are taught by professional urban planners, public administrators, environmental educators, historic preservationists, architects, designers, and real estate developers. Urban Planning faculty research is catalyzed by diverse partnerships with public, nonprofit and private partners and prominent public, nonprofit and industry funding sources. Outcomes include peer-reviewed publications, books and evidence-based action in new plans, policies, designs, and programs in Buffalo and beyond.

    Faculty List Directory

    Please visit the University at Buffalo and Urban and Regional Planning website for additional information about our faculty.

  • END 120LEC Introduction to Urban Environments
    Lecture

    An introductory urban environments course. Studies how physical, design, social, political and economic forces interact to shape and reshape our urban environments. Examines concepts and content related to cities, suburbs, and metropolitan regions within and outside the U.S. From multidisciplinary perspectives, covers media images of cities and suburbs, patterns and trends in urban environments over time and place, urban observation, demographics, culture, and design. Assesses contemporary urban issues, including race relations, environmental issues, and population problems. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. Open to all SUNY undergraduate students.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • END 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • END 212LEC Urban and Environmental Planning
    Lecture

    Urban and Environmental Planning (END 212) provides an introduction to the planning, design, and development of cities, communities, and the natural environments in which they are situated, with the creation of sustainable communities as the overall goal. Through urban and environmental planning, sustainable neighborhoods are seen as places which maintain and restore our natural and built environments, thereby creating a higher quality of life for residents. Topics include the foundations of urban and environmental planning, techniques used, the development process, and urban design issues. Examines urban and environmental planning foci, such as urbanization, physical sprawl, environmental design, land use, sustainable development, neighborhood planning, transportation systems, historic preservation, and environmental assessment. Open to all undergraduates. Fulfills the SUNY Social Science general education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • END 275LEC Environment and Landscapes
    Lecture

    Examines contemporary perspectives on environmental design. Focuses on the complex relationships between people, the natural and constructed environments, and landscapes. Introduces new ways of seeing, understanding, and communicating landscape design. Considers problems in the landscaped environment including greenspace, complex urban centers, post-industrial wastelands, physical infrastructure, and entire watersheds. Reviews how the planning and development of our landscaped settings affects quality of life in physical environments within the context of environmental design. May be offered on an intermittent basis. Open to all undergraduate majors.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • END 279LEC Exploring the Design of Buffalo Niagara
    Lecture

    Explores the planning and design history of the Buffalo Niagara region in relation to the future. Examines proposals aimed at revitalizing the economy, improving the quality of life, and protecting the environment of Buffalo Niagara for future generations. Involves historical plus current plans and designs accompanied with lectures, discussions, films, and readings. Introduces urban design and regional development theory and practice. Provides an opportunity to understand community design, the full scope of small to large scale regional work, and comprehend location of place in relationship to the Buffalo Niagara region. Researches the history of Buffalo Niagara communities, examine the place as planned, and critically interpret its history, plans, and designs. May be offered on an intermittent basis. Open to non-majors.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • END 285LEC Transportation in Environmental Design and Urban Life
    Lecture

    Introduces how communities look to urban transportation systems to address environmental design challenges, including urban development, congestion, pollution, sprawl, public safety, obesity, and physical isolation. Explores multi-modal transportation (walking, bicycle, public transit, vehicle) in U.S. cities and metropolitan areas in order to explain the central role of transportation in shaping environmental design, urban communities, and the lives of people. The course is both historical and topical; it examines the tandem evolution of transportation systems and urban development, and investigates current transportation debates such as environmental impacts, urban design, congestion, air quality, the role of government, and strategies for sustainable transportation travel. Includes lectures and field work. May be offered on an intermittent basis. Open to all SUNY undergraduate students. Fulfills the SUNY Humanities and SUNY Social Social Science General Education Requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 301LEC Perspectives On Land Use and Development
    Lecture

    Covers concepts and practices of urban land use and development in U.S. Topics include zoning, growth management, site design, environmental issues and land use evolution. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: END 120 or END 212.
  • END 302LEC Sustainable Urban Environments
    Lecture

    Examines the relationship of urban and natural environments, focusing on sustainable development and global climate change. Emphasis on biodiversity, pollution, efficiency, and renewable energy. Considers appropriate use of resources that are environmentally sound. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 303LEC Methods of Communication
    Lecture

    Develops communication skills on urban and environmental issues, and hones skills of description and reporting about urban and environmental places and policies. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: END 120 or permission of advisement.
  • END 305LEC Environmental Education and Urbanism
    Lecture

    Explores methods for creating public knowledge, awareness, and understanding toward the physical planning of our natural and urban environments. Develops competency and skills for environmental designers in presenting urban environmental information through education, communication, and performing an environmental assessment. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • END 306LEC Community + Education and Urban Development
    Lecture

    Examines ways in which education influences, and is influenced by, communities. Considers how educational institutions can respond to conditions and issues that exist in community environments. Reviews challenges confronting communities, educational institutions, and urban development. Explores and identifies opportunities for collaboration and partnerships. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: PD 120 or permission of advisement.
    Other Requisites: PD 306
  • END 307LEC Topics in Environmental Design
    Lecture

    Topics vary annually and may include urban design, sustainable development, environmental policies, land use development, neighborhood planning, community development, historic preservation, real estate development, transportation analysis, urban analytics, healthy communities, landscape studies, or economic development. The content of this course is variable and therefore repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 308SEM Health and Urban Environments
    Seminar

    Explores current health issues found in urban and physical environments. Examines diverse public health conditions, including environmentally-caused diseases, pollution-related diseases, aging populations, and the globalization of illness. Considers various community-based social and physical environmental solutions. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: Sophmore, Junior or Senior Standing Recommended
  • END 312LEC Design of Cities
    Lecture

    Traces evolution of urban form and character from Greek city-states to the present. Emphasizes how technological, social, economic, and political changes affect urban layout and functioning. This course is the same as ARC 316.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: END 120 or END 212 or ARC 121 or ARC 231 or ARC 234.
  • END 313LEC Local Government Policy and Politics
    Lecture

    Provides insights to the process and outcomes of local government decision-making. Topics include the types and powers of various local government entities, including: the influence of politics, how governments determine agendas, and implement projects/policies. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 319LEC The City Through Film: Built Environment in Mass Media
    Lecture

    Through weekly film and multi-media screenings, discussions, readings, and critiques, explores themes of architectural design, urban imagery, inner cities, suburbia, environmental design, physical development, community planning, politics, and their futures in mass media. The built environment serves as a medium that transmits, reinforces and reproduces social values, attitudes and behaviors. Examines how institutions attempt to shape public perspectives using images of the built environment through mass media. May be offered on an intermittent basis. This course is the same as ARC 320, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors.
  • END 321DIS History of Design
    Discussion

    A discussion course in which students explore the history of and current issues within the design disciplines, including Architecture, Design Studies, Environmental Design, Urban Planning, and Historic Preservation. Researches and analyzes historical and contemporary topics, and considers design's impact on society. Investigates ongoing design issues, historical national trends, and events affecting people, place, and the built environment.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 322DIS Race and Place in the Built Environment
    Discussion

    This course introduces students to the ways that historical conceptions of race and place have impacted the shape and design of our built environment. It examines the critical influence of race science on the civilizational narratives that were used to determine the meaning and content of 19th century American architecture. It also traces the effects of these racial discourses on domestic interpretations of African, Asian, and Latino building traditions. Students will review the tools that American architects have used to represent the social and cultural values of different racial and ethnic groups, from the Victorian houses of New England towns to the campus planning and design strategies of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Over the course of the semester, students will complete writing assignments that challenge them to interpret the many ways that the racial politics of the past continues to shape the design, structure, and character of today's built environment. Despite moving beyond the tenets of scientific racism, the social construction of racial identity still exerts a palpable influence on new patterns of residential segregation, voting districts, land-use patterns, and material investment in (or disinvestment from) in the public sphere. This course is the same as ARC 322.

    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: Junior/Senior Standing. Sophomores with >45 credit hours earned may be eligible for enrollment by permission of the instructor.
  • END 350SEM Environmental Design Workshop 1: Methods of Design Inquiry
    Seminar

    A majors-only core studio workshop. Introduces how to integrate research inquiry, information analysis, and environmental design. Provides students with methodologies in gathering, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating qualitative and quantitative information about the contemporary physical and urban environment. Data sources include U.S. Census materials, state and regional agency databases, community master plans, historical archives, and online and hardcopy reports and surveys. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. Enrollment in END 350 requires official admission to the Environmental Design BA, Junior class standing, a prerequisite GPA of 2.50 in END 120 plus END 212 plus ENG 105 or ENG 101, and an overall UB GPA of 2.33. Concurrent enrollment in the following courses is prohibited: END 120/END 350 and END 350/END 450.

    Credits: 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 105 and END 120, END 212 and 2.5 GPA; Junior Standing & Admission to the Environmental Design BA only.
  • END 356SLB Computing for Environmental Analysis
    Seminar

    Covers basics of geographic information systems (GIS) and other computing tools for understanding, mapping, and analyzing natural and built environments. Includes weekly computer lab. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing or permission of advisement.
  • END 357SEM Creative Problem Solving for Global Environments
    Seminar

    The grand challenges of the world's environment today, such as the global refugee crisis, are highly complex. Cultural, economic, political, environmental, and technological issues are intertwined, and these grand global challenges demand creative problem solving. This course, therefore, introduces and leverages multiple creative problem solving and environmental design thinking strategies to prepare students for engaging some of the greatest challenges of human history.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • END 360SLB Environmental Design Workshop 2: Graphic Communications
    Seminar

    A majors-only core studio workshop. Examines modes of visual literacy for comprehending the built environment. Introduces rudimentary graphic representation skills for visually communicating urban planning and design concepts through readings and hands-on exercises. Class activities include drawing, drafting, design fundamentals, generating computer graphics, and urban observation. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. Enrollment in END 360 requires official admission to the Environmental Design BA, Junior class standing, a prerequisite GPA of 2.50 in END 120 plus END 212 plus ENG 105 or ENG 101, and an overall UB GPA of 2.33. Concurrent enrollment in the following courses is prohibited: END 212/END 360, END 360/END 494, and END 360/END 498.

    Credits: 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 or ENG 105 and END 120, END 212 and 2.5 GPA; Junior Standing & Admission to the Environmental Design BA only.
  • END 363LEC Cities and Globalization
    Lecture

    Considers "world cities" and how global trends and forces shape the community design, politics, social life, environment, and economies of urban places. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 395LAB Special Topics Lab in Environmental Design
    Laboratory

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed environmental planning, methods of design inquiry, environmental information systems, urban design, historic preservation, and real estate development. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 1 - 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 395SEM Special Topics
    Seminar

    A major or minor elective. Topics vary by semester.

    Credits: 3 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 402LEC Real Estate Development Fundamentals
    Lecture

    Introduces students to the fundamentals of real estate development, including planning, site acquisition, project feasibility, finance, and physical development in urban environments. Uses case studies, small group activities, fieldwork, readings, and discussions. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: PD 212 and junior or senior standing in Environmental Design BA / Minor.
    Other Requisites: PD 402
  • END 403LEC Strategies of Property Management
    Lecture

    Introduces strategies and methods of property management, including creating financial reports, knowledge of property marketing, understanding leasing contracts, awareness of emerging practices in energy management, evolving security and emergency procedures, and enhancing tenant relations. May be offered on an intermittent basis. Includes lectures, discussion, and fieldwork. This course is dual listed with END 503 and URP 503.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: END 212 and junior or senior standing.
  • END 405LEC Urban Planning and Environmental Change
    Lecture

    Examines and assesses environmental information systems, the built environment, and demographic trends to explore the evolving role of urban planning in the context of global climate change. Introduces the environmental science of climate change, global responses, and urban planning strategies for climate change management. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: PD 120 or permission of advisement.
    Other Requisites: PD 355
  • END 406SEM Housing & Community Development
    Seminar

    Studies theories, concepts, and practices of housing and community development, emphasizing neighborhood planning and design in urban environments. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: PD 350.
    Other Requisites: PD 406
  • END 407LEC School Planning and Development
    Lecture

    Examines school planning within the larger context of neighborhood development. Considers how school planning and development creates opportunities for potential urban redevelopment as well as generating a sense of community pride and physical identity. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: PD 212.
  • END 408LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. A major or minor elective. Topics vary by semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 408SEM Race, Class, Gender, and the City
    Seminar

    Explores the intersectionality of race, class, gender & the city in the knowledge economy-based urban environment. Reviews how the shift from an industrial to knowledge-based economy reshaped and recreated the central city and its surrounding suburban region. In the new knowledge-based central city and suburban region [the urban metropolis], the interplay among race, class, gender, and income shapes urban structure, environmental design, and social interaction. The new urban metropolis is characterized by uneven neighborhood development, gentrification, and exclusive residential development. Examines the dynamics of race, along with social and gender inequality, and considers ways to reimagine underdeveloped neighborhoods. Discusses strategies to build "the just city," where equity and inclusive neighborhoods of choice dominate the urban landscape. This course is dual listed with URP 508.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 410LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed the policies and politics of local government. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 411LEC Environmental Design Information Systems
    Lecture

    A major or minor elective. Explores environmental design and urban development problems and possible solutions using information systems incorporating various data sources. Evaluates information and reports on trends for understanding planning, design, and development shaping our urban and community environments. Provides a setting in which students build upon computing and analytic skills utilizing information systems for supporting decision-making in environmental design. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: PD 350.
    Other Requisites: PD 409
  • END 412SEM Special Topics
    Seminar

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in environmental design and development planning in practice. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 413SEM Special Topics
    Seminar

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed legal issues in planning, design, and development. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 415LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed the development and management of real estate property. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 417LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 418SEM Global Innovation Challenge
    Seminar

    Overcoming global health disparities is a defining challenge of the 21st century. Finding sustainable, global solutions to end poverty and hunger, deliver clean water and quality shelter, and improve education and healthcare, however, is exceedingly complex and difficult. Using a creative, interdisciplinary approach and workshop format, the Global Innovation Challenge takes on major problems in global health, such as air pollution or refugee resettlement, to find viable solutions.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Pass/Not Pass (PNP)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 422SEM Economic Development Planning
    Seminar

    Covers theory, concepts, and practices in contemporary economic development planning. Considers alternative approaches to job growth, including industrial development, workforce training, and quality of life strategies. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: PD 350.
    Other Requisites: PD 422
  • END 425LEC Cad Technology in Env Dsn
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 426SEM Site Planning and Development
    Seminar

    Examines site planning, design, and development of residential, commercial, and industrial properties within various community settings. Reviews property site selection procedures and community landscape planning. Investigates activities within site development including planning, design, aesthetics, landform preparations, and renovations within urban environments. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: END 350SEM or permission of advisement.
  • END 428LEC Foundations of Historic Preservation
    Lecture

    Historic preservation theory related to urban and environmental planning, emphasizing preservation practice, including tools of effective preservation, legislation, community roles, economics, adaptive use, and management. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: END 279 or END 312 or ARC 231 or ARC 234 and Senior Class Standing.
  • END 435SEM Urban Managemnt & Govrnce
    Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 436DIS Citizen Planning School
    Discussion

    Citizen Planning School is a project- based, research-intensive, experiential learning course exploring the role of civic engagement in community-based planning and design efforts, promoting sustainable development in the Buffalo Niagara region through land use, transportation, housing, energy and climate, access to food, and more. Through a combination of academic preparation and firsthand experience engaging with diverse public constituencies, students will hone skills, identify key gaps in community planning, design, development, and set the stage for a more sustainable Buffalo Niagara. Citizen Planning School combines public engagement with action research to help meet the economic, environmental, and social challenges of the 21st century. Includes lectures, discussions, fieldwork, and site visits. This course is the same as ARC 436.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: Junior/Senior standing and permission of instructor.
  • END 437LEC Global Perspectives in Historic Preservation
    Lecture

    Historic preservation efforts take place within the context of accepted definitions of heritage within a variety of contexts. These definitions of cultural heritage have undergone a significant shift over time, as well as space: they can have vastly different meanings from one country or region to another. Historic preservation of cultural heritage is also increasingly contested, even within developed countries like the United States. This course explores how concepts of heritage have developed and evolved, and what heritage means in different contexts. Includes lectures and fieldwork, emphasizing a close reading of the texts, leading to intensive discussions.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • END 439LEC Local Government Finance and Budgeting
    Lecture

    Introduces students to the theory, practice, and real world applications local government finances. Concentrates on public budgeting issues and revenue analysis. Examines concerns in community planning, including fiscal impact of development, school finance, and tax increment financing models. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 441LEC Nonprofit Management
    Lecture

    This course introduces students to management issues in the nonprofit sector. Topics will include nonprofit: governance, board structure, planning, financial management, fundraising, grant writing, leadership, personnel management, and ethics. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: PD 350SEM or permission of advisement required.
  • END 442LEC Central City Revitalization
    Lecture

    A major or minor elective. Examines theory and practice of urban revitalization with a focus on downtown and commercial revitalization in metropolitan central cities. Place-based and people-based strategies for urban revitalization will be investigated and explored. Best Practices in urban planning and design, including current research and scholarship, will be analyzed. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 443SEM Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
    Seminar

    Introduces and practices techniques in negotiations and bargaining, particularly as applied to community planning and environmental conflict. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: PD 350.
  • END 450SEM Environmental Design Workshop 3 - Comprehensive Projects
    Seminar

    A majors-only capstone studio workshop. Engages students in community planning and environmental design fieldwork in Western New York. Under the instructor's supervision, students work with clients and neighborhood groups to understand complex community planning and environmental issues, research best practices, and develop final plans, comprehensive designs, and proposals. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. Enrollment in END 450 requires official admission to the Environmental Design BA, Senior class standing, END 350 plus END 360, an END/PD prefixed GPA of 2.50, and an overall UB GPA of 2.33. Concurrent enrollment in the following courses is prohibited: END 350/END 450.

    Credits: 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: END 350 and END 360. Senior standing and 2.5 GPA.
  • END 458SEM Designing Inclusive Environments
    Seminar

    Introduces concepts and techniques of inclusive design in our communities including site planning, property development, physical infrastructure, public spaces, accessibility, and landscapes. Considers the goal of creating beautiful and functional environments that can be used equally by everyone, irrespective of age, gender, or disability. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: PD 350.
  • END 459SEM Tourism and Recreation Development
    Seminar

    Examines a variety of specific tourism and recreation ventures and explores how they can be used to enhance development. Considered from several perspectives; including the role of tourism in economic development and the community level relationship between hosts and guests. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: PD 350
  • END 464SEM Infrastructure Planning & Design
    Seminar

    Introduces principles, operation and design of physical infrastructure systems including roads, public transportation, community facilities, public open space, surface drainage, and electric, gas, water, waste disposal, and telecommunication services.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 465LEC Urban Planning and Design 1
    Lecture

    Explores the current practice of urban design in the context of the United States. Examines new opportunities and constraints in environmental assessment, and management structure in local government; mechanisms for land-use controls or incentives; public investment strategy; and case studies assessing major development strategies used in today's practice. May be offered on an intermittent basis.This course is the same as ARC 465 and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: Upper class standing in Architecture major only or permission of advisement
  • END 466LEC Urban Planning & Design 2
    Lecture

    Urban Design: Built Environment Case Studies examines how American cities are so thinly spread out compared with many other nations. What is density and what does it mean? What are the relations between density and sustainability? This graduate seminar is intended to examine density as a most profound indicator of human settlement pattern especially in urbanized areas. One of hypotheses that the class addresses is this: Is denser the city, the greener it is or is it? Through the use of provocative readings and comparative analysis and mapping techniques, we compare major cities around the world to understand the relation between urban density and urbanism, its economic and environmental robustness: placemaking, good urban form and great streets -- all contributing to making cities great and robust ecologically, economically and socially. This course is the same as ARC 466 and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 467LEC Legal Issues in Planning and Development
    Lecture

    Explores historical and legal foundations of planning and development. Provides a legal perspective on land use, zoning policies, environmental regulations, housing, and other areas of interest. Reviews political, legal, and administrative institutions related to the planning and development process. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: PD 212.
  • END 469LAB GIS Applications
    Laboratory

    Covers theory, techniques, and applications in geographic information systems, particularly as applied to planning problems and issues. Includes weekly computer lab. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: PD 356.
  • END 469SEM Geographic Infomation Systems Applications
    Seminar

    Covers theories, techniques, and applications used in geographic information systems, particularly as applied to problems and issues found in environmental design and urban planning. Includes weekly computer lab. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 471SEM 3d Vis & Urban Simulation
    Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: PD 356.
  • END 473SEM Projects in Physical Planning and Design
    Seminar

    Designed to provide a basic understanding of the physical planning, design, and development process. Examines environmental, man-made, and policy elements that impact the physical development planning. Introduces methods for analyzing physical planning and design problems, the applications of physical development planning standards, an understanding of physical planning approaches, and the creation of planning, design, and development solutions.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: PD 350SEM.
  • END 474SEM Negotiation & Conflict Re
    Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 476SEM Comparaive and Global Development Issues
    Seminar

    Compares significant themes in global issues, global development, and global relations shaping urban and community environments on both the local and international levels.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • END 480LAB Environmental Design Study Abroad
    Laboratory

    The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. A majors-only study abroad course. Locations vary annually. In the past, undergraduate students have participated in environmental design study abroad programs taught in Australia, Cuba, Costa Rica, Canada, the Dutch Antilles, and other international locations as organized by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Other in-house study abroad programs will be offered on an ad-hoc basis by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning and the UB Office of Study Abroad, based upon faculty and student interest. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Summer
    Prerequisites: PD 212
    Other Requisites: PD 480
  • END 480LEC Environmental Design Study Abroad
    Lecture

    Locations vary annually. In the past, undergraduate students have participated in environmental design study abroad programs taught in Australia, Cuba, Costa Rica, the Dutch Antilles, and other international locations as organized by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Other in-house study abroad programs will be offered on an ad-hoc basis by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, based upon faculty and student interest. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Summer
    Prerequisites: PD 212.
    Other Requisites: PD 480
  • END 488LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed hidden systems of cities and urban environments- utilities, water, sewer, telecommunications, and transport. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • END 489SEM Special Topics
    Seminar

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed urban hazards and disasters and community revitalization planning. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 491SEM Urban Design Special Topics
    Seminar

    Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed urban design, environmental design, community planning, landscape development, and placemaking. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • END 492DIS Environmental Design Colloquium
    Discussion

    Topics vary annually. In the past, an examination of issues pertaining to environmental design, community planning, and regional development. Included historical, theoretical, formal, technical, and ethical concerns in planning, design, and development. Content defined by instructor; with group discussions focused on assigned readings and field trips. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 493DIS Environmental Design Colloquium 2
    Discussion

    Environmental Design Colloquium 2 is a discussion course in which students will explore the current issues found within the design disciplines, including Design Studies, Environmental Design, Urban Planning, Real Estate Development, and Historic Preservation. Students will research, communicate, and analyze historical and contemporary discourse, issues, and trends facing design and the urban environment.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • END 494SEM Visions of the City
    Seminar

    Student-led, faculty-guided reading course covers classic and contemporary books on the natural, built, and urban environments. An undergraduate senior capstone course.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: END 350SEM, END 360SLB, and Environmental Design Majors only.
    Corequisites: END 460SLB.Students may not enroll in END 360SLB and END 494SEM in the same semester.
  • END 496TUT Environmental Design Internship
    Tutorial

    Offers opportunity to work in urban or regional agencies in areas such as housing development, local government, strategic planning, transportation, community development, environmental affairs, land use, and urban design.

    Credits: 2 - 3
    Grading: Pass/Not Pass (PNP)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Prerequisites: Admission to the Environmental Design BA / Minor or permission of advisement.
    Other Requisites: PD 496
  • END 498SEM Research Projects in Environmental Design
    Seminar

    A required senior undergraduate research and creative activity course. Engages students in environmental design methodologies and individual research on a topic of contemporary interest. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed community gardens, urban food security, active living, community design, urban/suburban relations, urban subcultures, urban hazards and disasters, environmental planning, and urban development.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: END 350 and END 360, minimum GPA of 2.50.
    Corequisites: END 450.
  • END 499TUT Independent Study in Environmental Design
    Tutorial

    The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. Designed to add depth and breadth to a student's formal degree program. Students electing for END 499 Independent Study in Environmental Design must be accepted for work on a specific topic by a member of the University at Buffalo Urban Planning faculty, and must have the approval of the Urban Planning department chair. Students completing END 499 Independent Study in Environmental design will also participate in events sponsored by the University at Buffalo Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (UB CURCA). May be offered on an intermittent basis.

    Credits: 1 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: Admission to the Environmental Design BA only.
    Other Requisites: PD 499
 
Published: Apr 06, 2020 07:20:59