2017-18
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Geography (GEO)

Geography

105 Wilkeson Quad
Ellicott Complex
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14261
Ph: 716-645-2722
F: 716-645-2329
W: www.geog.buffalo.edu
Dr. Sean Bennett
Chair
Dr. Le Wang
Director of Undergraduate Studies

The Learning Environment

Geography teaches a wide variety of courses to a broad spectrum of students. The department currently offers a BA degree in Geography, where students may receive a general education in geography or they may wish to specialize in Earth Systems Science or Urban and Regional Analysis. The department also offers degrees in International Trade (BA) and Geographic Information Science (BS). Introductory courses include relatively large enrollment classes that embrace a range of media sources, active learning exercises, fieldtrips, technology, and online options to enhance the learning experience. Upper-division courses tend to include relatively smaller class sizes with unrivaled opportunities to engage students in research and thematic discourse, to use state-of-the-art technology and software, and to gain practical experience through independent projects, directed research, and internship opportunities with local stakeholders. The department also contributes substantively to general education.

About Our Facilities

Geography has created and maintains unique facilities to enhance the educational and research opportunities of its students. The Geographic Information and Analysis Laboratory is a multipurpose computing facility that supports the teaching and research needs of geospatial sciences with site licenses of specialized software packages. Dedicated laboratory space is available to pursue active learning in environmental sciences, including a variety of equipment and state-of-the-art facilities for students to use. Technology classrooms are available to serve the spectrum of informal seminar and recitation classes to relatively large lecture-hall courses.

About Our Faculty

Geography has a diverse faculty in terms of disciplinary focus, composition, and real-world experience. The department has 19.5 faculty that can be grouped into the following specializations: Earth Systems Science, Geographic Information Science, International Trade, and Urban and Regional Analysis. Faculty members represent the global community (hailing from North America, Europe, and several locations in Asia), and they come to the University at Buffalo after pursuing graduate degrees or post-doctoral or tenure-track positions at major national and international universities, conducting research at federal laboratories, or working in industry. All faculty have active research programs and are often supported with extramural funds from NIH, NSF, government agencies, and industry. Several faculty members have earned the rank of SUNY Distinguished Professor and have been awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities and Teaching, while others have been recognized for their contributions to international education and graduate student mentoring. The department is supported by about 12 teaching assistants and several adjunct instructors who assist in the learning experience.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit the Geography department website for additional information about our faculty.

GEO Courses


  • GEO 100LEC World Regions & Issues
    Lecture

    Examines the geography of the emerging global village, especially the stress between the increasing globalization of human societies and natural habitats, and their idiosyncratic traits. Deeply rooted in today's changing world, the course surveys regions of the world and the contemporary issues facing them.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 101LEC Earth Systems Science
    Lecture

    Earth Systems Science examines modern environmental problems through quantitative methods, analysis, and modeling grounded in basic and applied science and research. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the fundamental processes that dominate the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere, their characteristics and complex interactions, and their impact on human life and society.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 102LEC Introduction to Human Geography
    Lecture

    Introduction to thinking about human activities from a geographic perspective. While considering the "why of where," students will be exposed to the global dynamics of urbanization, industrialization, migration, economic development, international relations, geopolitics, and cultural geographies.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 103LEC Global Economic Geographies
    Lecture

    Examines the diverse economic systems that characterize a world economy in rapid transition. Highlights the complex processes of globalization and its impact on regions, cities, and countries. Examines the organization of economic activities and resources in the global economy.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 104LEC Environmental Science
    Lecture

    Environmental science is the interdisciplinary study of the physical, chemical, and biological systems that sustain life on our planet. In this course we will explore current environmental challenges such as the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable production of energy, and the implications of human population growth. The processes of scientific inquiry and discovery will be emphasized through investigation of specific case studies and the critical evaluation of the underlying scientific evidence.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 105LAB Earth, Environment, and Climate Laboratory
    Laboratory

    Weekly labs will cover interdisciplinary environmental topics such as: climate change, earthquakes, fracking, species extinctions, and water resources. Students will use the scientific method to critically evaluate environmental controversies, explore the role of ethics in science, and learn to distinguish science from pseudo-science.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Corequisites: GEO 101 or GEO 104 or GEO 106.Students must have taken or be enrolled in GEO 101 or GEO 104 or GEO 106 in order to register for GEO 105. If a student wishes to resign from only one component, they must contact the department for approval.
  • GEO 106LEC Global Climate Change
    Lecture

    Examines climate changes of the past, present and future. Considers the various causes of past and present climate change and how to predict future changes. Describes predicted environmental and social impacts of, and possible solutions to, future climate change.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 112LEC International Health
    Lecture

    This is an introductory course in international health. The course will focus on understanding the environmental, economic, and social factors that result in health disparities within and between places. The complex relationships between economic development, population structure, migration, and disease will be examined in detailed case studies. The effectiveness of health interventions and international health aid will be evaluated. Finally, the class will address the health impacts of global environmental change.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 120LEC Maps: Earth From Above
    Lecture

    Provides the knowledge required to be an intelligent map user. It is also designed to prepare students for further studies in geography, cartography, and geospatial technologies. Topics include map making and coordinate systems, issues regarding map scale and projections, navigation and way finding using maps, techniques of thematic mapping, introductions to remote sensing and geographic information systems, emerging mapping technologies and applications, and using internet mapping services.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • GEO 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • GEO 200LEC The Ocean World
    Lecture

    Introduces oceanography and its relationship to environmental, economic, and strategic aspects. Considers the impact of humans on the ecological balance among the oceans, continents, atmosphere, and living things, as well as ports, ships and maritime law.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 201LEC Disasters: A Study of Hazards
    Lecture

    Studies natural and human-induced disasters; such as storms, earthquakes, floods, fires, chemical pollution, and impact of war on the physical and social environment. Investigates risk taking, human reaction to disasters, and health-related studies of hazards. Utilizes case studies, slides, and films.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 211LLB Univariate Statistics in Geography
    Lecture

    Introduces probability as a measure of uncertainty. Addresses the use of such measures of uncertainty for describing data, and for making inferences about large populations from small samples. These descriptive and inferential aspects of statistics are illustrated using geographic examples from a wide variety of different fields.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 231LEC U.S. Contemporary Problems
    Lecture

    Examines spatial structures and growth processes involving contemporary spatial dynamics of the American socioeconomic systems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 281LEC Web-Based Geographic Information Systems
    Lecture

    Recent Advances in internet technology have stimulated rapid development of on-line imaging and mapping systems. This course provides a systematic introduction to these internet-based digital imaging and mapping systems in order to familiarize students with Internet-based tools and data and allow them to explore and understand the spatial distribution of natural and constructed phenomena. Through a combination of lectures and exercises, students will develop and practice the following on-line skills: using interface of on-line systems, digital map display in 2D and 3D, digital image display in 2D and 3D, flight simulation, multiple image and map management, measurements, navigation, spatial query, feature selection and buffering, and customized map making.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 330LEC Dynamics of International Business
    Lecture

    Examines the rapidly changing dynamics of the international business environment and its impact on corporate strategies and patterns of international trade, investment and development. Covers the political, legal, technological and cultural underpinnings of the global economy. Provides students with a solid foundation for conducting international business research and making sense of current events.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 333LEC International Trade
    Lecture

    Involves a theoretical and empirical study of the spatial aspects of commodity flows among countries and regions; also examines conditions leading to trade, and to barriers to the movement of goods.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 334LEC International Business Cultures
    Lecture

    Introduces students to the interconnections among culture, social expectations, and international business. Covers cross-cultural communication and negotiation, cross-cultural management and alliance formation, and corporate social and environmental responsibility. The course is designed to challenge students to understand difference and to overcome stereotypes in thinking about the operation of business in different parts of the world.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 345LEC Water Resources
    Lecture

    Examines the occurrence, use, management, and conservation of water and water resources in the U.S. and around the world. The course further discusses the environmental, economic, and social implications of floods, droughts, dams, water usage, and waste water, as well as current issues in water quality, water pollution, and water resource regulation.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 101 Or GLY 101
  • GEO 347LEC Climatic Geomorphology
    Lecture

    Introduces land-forming processes at work on the Earth's surface, including water, wind, waves and ice. Emphasizes the roles of climate and human impact on earth surface processes, and it considers the hazardous consequences of these processes, such as flooding, landslides, and coastal erosion.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 101 Or GLY 101
  • GEO 348LEC Landform Development
    Lecture

    Studies plate tectonics, structure, volcanism, minerals, rocks, weathering, slope development, and fluvial and coastal geomorphology.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 350LEC Landform Field and Laboratory Techniques
    Lecture

    Introduces data collection techniques in Earth Systems Science. Students will actively participate in the collection and analysis of data using a wide range of field and laboratory equipment, with all activities linked to relevant environmental and geomorphic issues. Students will develop and enhance their skills in data collection, reduction, and analysis, analytical thinking, scientific writing, and the preparation of professional reports.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: GEO 101 Or GLY 101
  • GEO 352LEC Introduction to Soils
    Lecture

    Introduces the concepts of soil science, composition and classification of soils, and the spatial distribution of major soil categories. Analyzes soil properties, soil/plant relationships, nutrients, land management practices, and ecological and engineering problems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 101 Or GLY 101
  • GEO 356LEC Forest Ecology
    Lecture

    Explores forests in terms of their diverse structure, composition, and function. Examines factors that control growth of individual trees, development of forest stands, and dynamics of forest landscapes. Field trips and lab work develop the ability to recognize and reconstruct forest history, using a combination of forest structure and tree-ring analysis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: BIO 200 Or GEO 101 Or SSC 118
  • GEO 366LEC Urban Geography
    Lecture

    Provides an introduction to the knowledge areas of urban systems and structure, and a brief overview of fundamentals and general information that one needs to build upon in order to become a professional urban geographer. The course examines the formation and growth dynamics of cities, interprets the mechanism under which the urban space functions, and observes the industrial, residential, migratory, environmental, planning and transportation aspects of urban society.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 367LEC Urban Social Geography
    Lecture

    Examines human activities central to the internal working of cities in the context of globalization, fragmentation, and difference. Students will consider theories about how society and space mutually condition each other in processes of social stratification and discrimination that foster class, race, gender, and other differences and cause their expression on the urban landscape.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 381LLB Cartography
    Lecture

    Introduces fundamentals of computer cartography, which is the study and practice of making map representations of the Earth. Provides practical training in the techniques for the representation, manipulation and display of spatial data using computer software.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 120
  • GEO 389LEC Business Geographics
    Lecture

    Explores the application of GIS in business. Storage and spatial referencing of data are two processes that need to be carried out to make any business successful. GIS can help not only in these tasks, but also in identification of patterns and relationships that can save companies money and increase profit.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: GEO 103 Or GEO 120
  • GEO 401LEC GEO 401- Special Topics 1
    Lecture

    Critically considers a selected issues in geographical studies.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • GEO 402LEC Special Topics 2
    Lecture

    Critically considers a selected issues in geographical studies.

    Credits: 2
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • GEO 403LEC GEO403- Special Topics 3
    Lecture

    Critically considers selected issues in geographical studies.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • GEO 411LEC Multivariate Statistics in Geography
    Lecture

    Provides an introduction to techniques of multivariate analysis. Topics include ANOVA, simple regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, principal components analysis, and cluster analysis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 211
  • GEO 412LEC Geography of Health
    Lecture

    Studies human disease and health from an ecological prospective. Students gain an appreciation for the geographic variation in the rates of both infectious and chronic diseases. The effect of the environment will be examined in terms of population density, climate, socio-economic conditions, political situation, mobility, urbanization, pollution, cultural practices, and access to health care.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 418LEC Population Geography
    Lecture

    Examines recent trends in population redistribution in the United States. Considers methods for producing population estimates and forecasts, and explores application of population analysis to the planning problems of government and business.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 419LEC Transportation and Society
    Lecture

    Studies evolution of the U.S. transportation system. Examines contemporary transportation problems; including provision of transportation, transport networks, transport flows, urban transportation, logistics, and information technologies. Also considers transport and urban forms.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 102 Or GEO 103 Or GEO 410
  • GEO 420LAB Transportation and Spatial Information
    Laboratory

    Overview of data used in transportation, including travel behavior surveys, vehicle locations, and traffic information. The course also covers GIS and Transportation (GIS-T) data models, data accuracy, primary and secondary data collection and storage approaches, geo-processing of network data, principles of Intelligent Transportation Systems, and location-based services.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 420LEC Transportation and Spatial Information
    Lecture

    Overview of data used in transportation, including travel behavior surveys, vehicle locations, and traffic information. The course also covers GIS and Transportation (GIS-T) data models, data accuracy, primary and secondary data collection and storage approaches, geo-processing of network data, principles of Intelligent Transportation Systems, and location-based services.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 425LEC Industrial/Business Geography
    Lecture

    Industry dynamics and regional change in a globalized world. In understanding the relationship between the firm and the region, the activities of other agents of regional development (e.g., universities, government, non-government sectors, labor markets) will also be taken into consideration.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 426SEM Senior Geography Seminar
    Seminar

    Topics vary each semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 430LEC Applied Urban Geography
    Lecture

    The study of the spatial structure of urban and metropolitan areas. Among other topics, it includes: (1) a study of the changing form of urban areas over time; (2) the behavior of people that gives rise to particular urban form; (3) the ways in which the internal structure of cities affects behavior and welfare; and, (4) the various ways in which people perceive and interact with their environment.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 435LEC Conservation Biogeography
    Lecture

    Examines components of biodiversity: what it is, why we like it, where it is highest, and what threatens it. Focuses on the application of spatial solutions to biodiversity maintenance in wildlands, and to biodiversity management in working landscapes (especially logged but also farmed). Case studies and a field trip are employed to explore the usefulness of the methods.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: BIO 309 Or GEO 356 Or SSC 315
  • GEO 444LEC Advanced Earth System Science
    Lecture

    Presents and discusses concepts, theories and applications in Earth System Science investigating the complexity of physical, chemical, and biological processes in the geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and ecosphere. Fundamental understanding of the Earth system includes emphasizing these dynamic processes and their interaction that extend over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The lecture aims to create an interdisciplinary learning environment that supports understanding and communicating with other disciplines about the complex environmental processes. Possible impact and solutions to local, regional, and global environmental problems are assessed through modeling scenarios of changes in biogeochemical cycles.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 445LEC Restoration Ecology
    Lecture

    Restoration ecology is the art and science of repairing lands that have become damaged by natural or human disturbance. Examines ecological and social reasons for restoration. Focuses on how to identify and repair the key physical, chemical and biotic components of damaged ecosystems. Case studies and a field trip help are used to develop the theories and methods.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 356 or BIO 309 or GLY 309
  • GEO 446LEC Global Change Ecology
    Lecture

    Global environmental change has significant impacts on social and ecological systems around the world. Global Change Ecology is an emerging field that aims to understand the ecological implications of environmental change (especially anthropogenic climate change) and to assess risks under future global change. The course will include lectures, discussions of important scientific articles, hands-on exercises in conducting scientific research, and a group project to investigate novel scientific questions. In this course, students will review the basics of the earth system and climate change before investigating how organisms in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems respond to climate change. Finally, we will consider the impacts of future climate change and the implications in conservation policy and adaptation management.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GLY 309 or BIO 309.
  • GEO 448LEC Stream Restoration
    Lecture

    Examines the scientific basis for stream restoration programs in the U.S. and worldwide through a consideration of interdisciplinary themes and practices. Participants will actively discuss river processes, aquatic ecology, restoration needs and goals, restoration approaches, ecological economics, and the uncertainty and sustainability of restoration designs. Students are exposed to a variety of stream restoration concepts through lectures, seminars, and independent projects.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 345 Or GEO 347 Or GLY 312
  • GEO 449LEC Fluvial Geomorphology
    Lecture

    Examines the origin, geometry, water flow, and sediment transport associated with streams and rivers, and how these processes and forms vary in time and space. Places particular emphasis on the analytic description of physical processes, the adjustment of rivers to natural and human-induced disturbances, the interactions between fluvial processes, water quality and aquatic habitat, and emerging areas of research.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 345 Or GEO 347 Or GLY 312
  • GEO 449REC Fluvial Geomorphology
    Recitation

    Examines the origin, geometry, water flow, and sediment transport associated with streams and rivers, and how these processes and forms vary in time and space. Places particular emphasis on the analytic description of physical processes, the adjustment of rivers to natural and human-induced disturbances, the interactions between fluvial processes, water quality and aquatic habitat, and emerging areas of research.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 460LEC Geography of Development
    Lecture

    Examines how regions, cities, and countries are engaged in economic, political, and institutional strategies in order to tackle problems related to poverty, underdevelopment, economic decline, and/or economic stagnation. Attention is given to the influences of local and global forces, actors, and policies on regional and national competition and development.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: GEO 103 Or GEO 330 Or GEO 333
  • GEO 462LAB Network and Location Analysis
    Laboratory

    Examines the basic theories and concepts behind transportation networks, their structure and operation as well as their need in different applications such as location theory. Approaches topics from both a theoretical and a GIS perspective. There will be a weekly laboratory to provide hands-on experience in the different topics.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 462LEC Network and Location Analysis
    Lecture

    Examines the basic theories and concepts behind transportation networks, their structure and operation as well as their need in different applications such as location theory. Approaches topics from both a theoretical and a GIS perspective. There will be a weekly laboratory to provide hands-on experience in the different topics.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 464LAB Mobility and Flows
    Laboratory

    Studies the human decision-making process underlying spatial mobility that results in the creation of patterns and daily routines. Covers the different environments and theories involved in the process, as well as the modeling techniques that have been used, emphasizing the application of Geographic Information Systems.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 464LEC Mobility and Flows
    Lecture

    Studies the human decision-making process underlying spatial mobility that results in the creation of patterns and daily routines. Covers the different environments and theories involved in the process, as well as the modeling techniques that have been used, emphasizing the application of Geographic Information Systems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 470LEC Integrated Environmental Management
    Lecture

    Introduces an integrated framework for natural resource management that addresses biophysical, social, and economic issues affecting natural resources such as water, soil, air, plant and animal communities and their use through agriculture, forestry, and fishery. The multidisciplinary approach equips the participants with the necessary tools and techniques to develop sound management policy and practice at the watershed scale from small watersheds to large basins. Outlines methods for problem definition and goal setting to elect appropriate and effective management strategies and procedures for monitoring and implementation.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: GEO 101 Or GLY 101
  • GEO 475LEC Landscape Modeling with GIS
    Lecture

    Utilizes concepts and software tools to appropriately analyze geo-spatial data and model environmental processes. The course uses exercises related to physical processes, but also presents and discusses methods and examples in the fields of environmental science, ecology and human geography.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: GEO 481
  • GEO 479LLB GIS and Environmental Modeling
    Lecture

    Emphasizes GIS applications for environmental modeling, which is loosely defined as any study that contains an environmental element. This is an intermediate level GIS course. GIS methodology design is the primary focus of the lectures and the following topics are discussed: basic GIS methods, using statistics to test and validate GIS methods, and integrating GIS with environmental models. Case studies are used to support the discussion of method design and help students select appropriate GIS methods for a project. The hands-on laboratory exercises focus on learning advanced GIS methods in order to help students implement a GIS project of their interest.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 481
  • GEO 480LEC Critical Logistics Studies
    Lecture

    This course examines the origins and ongoing impacts of the `Logistical Revolution?, including its roots within management and military sciences of the 1960s, the technologies and policies that made it possible, its reorganization of supply chains and world trade, its reconstruction of transnational and urban infrastructures, and its reshaping of labor relations.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 481LLB Geographic Information Systems
    Lecture

    Provides a general introduction to the principles and applications of geographic information systems (GIS). The lectures cover several fundamental aspects of GIS: (1) the basics of a GIS system, (2) GIS data and sources of data, (3) GIS analysis functions, and (4) GIS applications and related issues. The laboratory exercises are based on the leading GIS software, ArcGIS, and are designed to help students understand the lecture materials and gain hands-on experiences in GIS data acquisition, spatial database management, spatial analysis, and mapping.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • GEO 482LEC Locational Analysis
    Lecture

    Surveys the basic types of geographic location problems encountered in the real world and examines basic techniques applied to solve those problems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: GEO 120
  • GEO 483LLB Remote Sensing
    Lecture

    Introduces the principles and applications of remote sensing, and the basic techniques of digital image processing. The lectures introduce a number of fundamental topics of remote sensing: the interaction between energy and Earth surface, major sensor systems and images, basic techniques for image enhancement and image classification, classification accuracy assessment, and applications of remote sensing. The laboratory exercises are designed to help students understand and gain hands-on experiences in digital image process techniques introduced in the lectures.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 485LEC Cartography and Geographic Visualization
    Lecture

    Provides an overview of cartographic design and visualization within the context of GIS and multi-media web presentation to enhance the visualization skills expected of a modern geographer. The course will cover both theoretical and practical issues associated with visual representation, cartographic design process, exploratory data analysis, data uncertainty, quality and generalization, thematic mapping, web designing, online mapping and other multi-media applications.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: GEO 120 Or GEO 381
  • GEO 487LEC Thematic Cartography
    Lecture

    Applies formal principles of graphic design with skills of computer and manual cartographic production. Introduces principles and skills of computer-assisted cartographic production, and of photographic and digital-enhancement techniques that may be incorporated in the map production process.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 488LAB GIS Design
    Laboratory

    Emphasizes problems and methods for defining GIS user needs and the development cycle. Adapts methods and software engineering to the GIS planning process. Topics include product identification, data sources, system selection, and implementation scheduling.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 488SEM GIS Design
    Seminar

    Emphasizes problems and methods for defining GIS user needs and the development cycle. Adapts methods and software engineering to the GIS planning process. Topics include product identification, data sources, system selection, and implementation scheduling.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 489LAB GIS Algorithms and Data Structures
    Laboratory

    Examines the data models for geographic information systems. Student programming projects emphasize alternative methods of implementing common GIS operations.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 489LEC GIS Algorithms and Data Structures
    Lecture

    Examines the data models for geographic information systems. Student programming projects emphasize alternative methods of implementing common GIS operations.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • GEO 493LEC Dynamic Modeling of Human and Environmental Systems
    Lecture

    This course will provide hands-on experience in the construction and simulation of dynamic models to represent human and environmental systems. The paradigm case of such systems is diffusion over space and time: diffusion of ideas by word of mouth, diffusion of diseases by contact between individuals, and diffusion of forest fires and invasive species across landscapes. A range of modeling paradigms will be covered, from continuous representations of system dynamics to discrete interactions of individual/agent-based models. Calculus and programming experience are helpful but not required. Exercises and readings will be provided from a variety of sources reflecting current challenges that practitioners face in the multi-disciplinary field of dynamic modeling.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 496TUT Geographic Internship
    Tutorial

    For advanced students. Involves a work opportunity in a local governmental agency or firm. See the director of undergraduate studies for more information.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Pass/Not Pass (PNP)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • GEO 497TUT Geography Honors Program
    Tutorial

    Students who have completed at least 96 credit hours and who have a minimum GPA of 3.5 in geography and overall are eligible to participate in the honors program. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies for more information.

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • GEO 499TUT Independent Study
    Tutorial

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Geography

105 Wilkeson Quad
Ellicott Complex
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14261
Ph: 716-645-2722
F: 716-645-2329
W: www.geog.buffalo.edu
Dr. Sean Bennett
Chair
Dr. Le Wang
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Published: November 16, 2017 08:32:51 AM