2017-18
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Judaic Studies (JDS)

Jewish Thought

712 Clemens Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14261-0026
Ph: 716-645-0757
W: www.jewishthought.buffalo.edu
Sergey Dolgopolski
Chair
Alexander Green
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Michele Parente
Assistant to the Chair

The Learning Environment

The Jewish Studies program fosters a strong sense of community, in which students feel nurtured and supported. Faculty know students by name and are uniquely able to help them develop intellectually and to craft a program of study suited to their particular interests. The Department of Jewish Thought regularly hosts lectures, conferences and events, with twice-yearly departmental dinners and receptions. These offer unique opportunities to learn about specific aspects of Jewish studies, and, often, the chance to meet famous scholars in the field. Together, these events work to create a strong community of inquiry.

About Our Facilities

Many of our classes and event are held in the Samuel Friedman Library in 708 Clemens. This is the geographical heart of our department, featuring books related to all areas of the Jewish experience that foster the passion for inquiry that is central to the Jewish tradition. This provides an intimate setting for students to get to know each other and their professors. That distinguishes Jewish Studies courses from those in other departments.

About Our Faculty

The Department of Jewish Thought is a leading program of its kind and the only department of Jewish Thought in all of the United States. The faculty consists of nationally and internationally prominent scholars who are also devoted teachers. Their interests include philosophy, literature, Bible and Talmud, ethics, mysticism, and gender and sexuality studies, and much more.

We encourage students to see professors whose research and area of expertise is of potential interest for them and establish working research relationships with the professor.

We recommend that students meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies (709 Clemens Hall, marlaseg@buffalo.edu), to discuss their future program and the requirements of the department.

Please visit our department website for additional information about our faculty.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit the Jewish Thought department website for additional information about our faculty.

JDS Courses


  • JDS 101LEC Introduction to Jewish History
    Lecture

    Major political, social, and theological trends in Jewish history, from the formation of ancient Israel until the present day.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 102LEC Religion and Violence
    Lecture

    Is religion inherently violent, or inherently peaceful? Scholars of religions take a wide range of stances on the relationship between religion and violence, some arguing that it is inherent to religion, others that it is culturally and economically motivated, and others still that it is simply inherent to human nature. We?ll study critical theories about religion and violence and test them on historical and recent conflicts. The course will be organized around four overlapping modes of violence: martyrdom and redemptive suffering: the violence of social stratification and othering, traditional, political war and; apocalyptic and spiritual warfare..

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 103LEC Introduction to Judaism
    Lecture

    Survey of Judaism and the rich Jewish legacy: basic philosophical, theological, social, and political values and practices of Judaism as they developed over time in a variety of social and political environments.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 111LEC Great Jewish Books
    Lecture

    Introduces and analyzes great works of Jewish literature from ancient to modern times: the Bible, Talmud; Guide for the Perplexed; Kuzari; poetry of the Golden Age in Spain; the great moderns.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 112LEC Women in the Jewish Family
    Lecture

    Comparative contemporary social and psychological studies of women intermingle with rabbinic ones in an endeavor to bring into sharper focus women's status, social roles, behavior, and impact on Jewish life; the Jewish woman in historical perspective, drawing upon oriental, European, and modern American societies as well as contemporary Feminist perspectives.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 141LEC Introduction to Yiddish I
    Lecture

    Students acquire the fundamentals of the sound system of Yiddish structure and basic reading and writing skills.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 142LEC Introduction to Yiddish II
    Lecture

    Second semester of introductory course.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 150LR Avant Gardes
    Lecture

    his course will be taught on a rotational basis with faculty from COL, ART and RLL. Beginning in the late 19th Century a new cultural movement was born: the avant garde. This course seeks to understand how and why art and literature that deliberately challenged popular understanding came to be dominant. This course will introduce you to the main currents of 19th and 20th Century avant garde history, theory, and aesthetic practice. Grounding our approach in the specific geographic and historical conditions that gave rise to these individual movements, we will explore their expression through a wide variety of mediums including art and visual culture, literature, poetry, music, and film. We will read both primary and secondary documents as we grapple with these movements? modernist and revolutionary agendas in order to assess their successes and failures and evaluate their impacts and legacies.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 195LEC Multicultural Foundations of Jewish Phil; Jewish, Muslim, and Christian sources.
    Lecture

    This course examines the development of Jewish Philosophy in its multicultural, cosmopolitan medieval context, examining Jewish, Muslim, and Christian sources.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • JDS 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • JDS 201LEC Israel and the Ancient Near East
    Lecture

    People of the Bible; the environment in which they lived; what they absorbed and rejected from Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia, Iran, Egypt. How to critically read ancient texts in comparative contexts.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 202LEC Israel and the Emergence of Judaism
    Lecture

    Post-biblical Jews and Judaism; their adaptation to Greco-Roman life; rise of Jewish sectarianism; writing of the Talmud. How to critically read ancient texts in comparative contexts.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 204SEM Introduction to Jewish Ethics
    Seminar

    This course will examine the meaning of Jewish ethics as a development of character and the obedience to universal principles of justice. We will then examine Jewish perspectives on contemporary ethical issues such as war and peace, feminism, abortion, economics and charity, and the environment.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 205LEC Historical Geography and Archaeology of Israel
    Lecture

    Methods and results of excavation in Israel; development of material culture (pottery, architecture, and so forth) and its interpretation.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 206LEC Chassidic Philosophy
    Lecture

    Historical context and causes of the rise of the Chassidic movement and specific Chassidic sects in modern Eastern Europe. Basic concepts and practices as revised and interpreted by Chassidic leaders.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 207LEC Gender, Judaism, Society
    Lecture

    This course explores the role of gendering in Judaism over time and space, using a variety of primary texts and theoretical models.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 208LEC Holocaust and After: Literature, Thought and Culture
    Lecture

    How does literature impact our understanding of the Holocaust? Is it possible to actually know this event? This course studies the Holocaust through a variety of genres, including poetry, novels, short stories, plays, and memoirs to gain a better understanding of the Holocaust as a significant event in world history. Students will study Holocaust and its political, cultural, and social implications through the lens of a variety of writers.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 209LEC Women in Jewish Literature
    Lecture

    The course will chart the role of women in modern Jewish literature. We will consider portrayals of women in traditional Jewish sources, and focus on the way that Jewish women authors sought to challenge or develop such portrayals in their own writings.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 210LEC Introduction to the Old Testament
    Lecture

    Critical, thematic, historic, and literary study of the roots of Judeo-Christian tradition as recorded in the writings of ancient Israel; different methods of biblical criticism.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 212LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary by semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 214LEC The American Jewish Woman
    Lecture

    Relationships and conflicts that shaped the identity of the American Jewish woman: Jewish women and the American women's rights movement; immigrant Jewish women and labor activism; impact of feminism on Judaism.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 216LEC The Origin of Ethics and Politics
    Lecture

    The meaning of ethics and its relationship to the formation and purpose of the political community is one of the central debates that have animated Western philosophers and theologians across time. How do political communities form and why? What defines a just and fair society? One society may consider a certain action morally correct and another culture may consider the same action morally incorrect. Why is that? How do we know what is good and evil, right and wrong? Is there one standard that unites different value systems or are all systems equally correct and variable?

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 225LEC Modern Times and Religion
    Lecture

    The 19th century Industrial Revolution (steam engine, railroad, mass production) is not yet the 20th century Communications Revolution (phone, radio, movies, TV, computers, internet, Wi-Fi, cell phones, cable). The last thoughts and outlooks of a three thousand year old spiritual-intellectual heritage in the West reach their fruition and open new prospects, such as the spread of democracy, the rise of liberal religion, the growth of metropolitan culture, and the prospect of general prosperity. Seeking these breakthroughs at their sources, we will explore the old and the new in the prose and poetry of Mendelsohn, Hegel, Feuerbach, Schopenhauer, Marx, Melville, Dostoyevsky, Whitman, Comte, Darwin, Bergson, Nietzsche and Freud, among others.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 229LEC Medieval Judaism
    Lecture

    Medieval Jewish texts, culture, imaginative literature, ritual, practice and thought.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 230LEC Modern Jewish History
    Lecture

    Jewish experience from the late 18th century to the present day; Western and Eastern European Jewry; ethnic origins and backgrounds of contemporary Jewry in the United States, Canada, and Israel.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 235LEC The American Jewish Experience
    Lecture

    American Jewish life from colonial beginnings to the present: immigration; assimilation; social mobility; education and the family; group identity.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 237LEC History of Israel and Zionism
    Lecture

    This course will chart the development of a prophetic persona in Hebrew Literature in relation to the Zionist Project. We will reflect upon the specific attributes of the genre of prophetic Zionist Literature and consider it within the historical, literary and theological contexts from which it emerged. Readings include: Abraham Mapu, Judah Leib, Gordon, Ahad Ha-am, and Chaim Nachman Bialik.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 242LEC Hebrew Literature in Translation
    Lecture

    Readings of the major Hebrew authors from the Haskalah (nineteenth-century Hebrew language renaissance) until today's writers in Israel and America. Themes emphasize cultural survival, Jewish identity and other current topics in Hebrew literature.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 250LEC Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
    Lecture

    This course introduces students to the grammatical structure and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew. It includes basic Biblical passages for students to translate into English and to analyze. The course has no prerequisites and is offered in English.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 253LEC Jewish, Christian, Islamic Ethics
    Lecture

    How similar is Jewish, Christian and Islamic thought? Do they share a common ethics? This course will examine some central thinkers and works within each tradition, while comparing and contrasting different perspectives on God, the prophet, sacred texts, ethics, free will and tolerance for those of other faiths.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 254LEC Interpreting the Old Testament: the Great Jewish Commentators
    Lecture

    How did Jews interpret the Bible before biblical criticism? We will examine the different methodologies of classic interpreters such as Rashi, Nachmanides, Ibn Ezra, Gersonides, Arama and Abravanel through the varied approaches of midrash, philosophy, philology and mysticism. Topics to be discussed include creation, leadership, ethics, sexuality, religious polemics, time, history, and Mosaic authorship.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 255LEC Jewish Folklore and Magic
    Lecture

    This course explores Jewish Folk narrtives and practices.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 260LEC Midrash: Rabbinic Exegesis
    Lecture

    Examination of the creative literary devices and novel interpretations of Biblical and extra-Biblical narratives by later rabbinic scholars. What are the rabbis trying to accomplish?

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 261LEC Responsa Literature
    Lecture

    Survey of the Responsa literature through which authoritative rabbis answer every day life questions and that began in the post-Talmudic period and has continued to flourish until the present. On what basis are answers formulated? What gives authority to the answers? Selected examples to be examined in detail.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 262LEC Topics in Hebrew Language and Literature
    Lecture

    Hebrew grammar or that of other Semitic languages (not Arabic) and reading of various periods' literary texts in the original tongue.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 264LEC World Music
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 265LEC Readings in the Hebrew Bible
    Lecture

    Readings of selected biblical literature in original Hebrew.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 266LEC Minor Hebrew Prophets
    Lecture

    Book of Amos and other minor prophets in Hebrew; analyzes the style of Hebrew prophecy; grammatical exercises to improve and reinforce knowledge of syntax and vocabulary construction.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 267LEC Ancient Western Wisdom
    Lecture

    Reawakening ancient debates surrounding science, ethics, aesthetics, skepticism, epicureanism, myth, stoicism, poetry, prophecy, polytheism and monotheism, this course will examine the meaning of the good, the true and the beautiful.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 268LEC Human and Animal
    Lecture

    The course will examine various depictions of human-animal relationship in Western literature and culture, from classical times to modern times. By looking at these texts, we will chart the emergence of a figure that occupies a borderline state between human and animal, and explore its implications for our understanding of Jewish and Christian relationships as well as human and animal nature. Readings include: Ovid, Marie de France, Hobbes, Shakespeare, Heine, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Kafka, and more.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • JDS 270LEC American Jewish Community
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 280LEC Jewish Mysticism
    Lecture

    Origins and development of Kabbalah. Kabbalist readings of Creation, the soul, reincarnation, attachment to the divine. Role of "mysticism" in Jewish religion and community life.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • JDS 283LEC The Holocaust and Jewish Law
    Lecture

    Full range of legal and ethical problems posed during the Holocaust and certain precedent-setting decisions set down in the Responsa literature.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 284LEC Justice in Bibles, Law, and Philosophy
    Lecture

    A comparative study of the relationship between justice, law, and society in pagan, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Thought.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 285SEM Jewish Law
    Seminar

    Introduces various hermeneutic processes, synthetic and analytic, out of which Jewish law developed its specific and intricate legal systems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 286LEC Prayer and Altered States
    Lecture

    What is prayer and how does it work? How is it related to meditation and song? This course explores the phenomenology of prayer, meditation and religious music, their ritual function, and their effects on the brain, on personality, and community. We focus on Jewish sources, placing them in historical context and comparing them to those of other religions such as Hinduism and Christianity.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 296LEC Jewish Business Ethics
    Lecture

    History and development of Jewish business law and ethics; comparative study of Jewish and American law relating to business and economic issues.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 300LEC Hist & Psych of Holocaust
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 301LEC Psychology of Religious Ecstasy: Sex, drugs, Rock & Roll and Religion.
    Lecture

    This course examines religious ecstasy achieved through ritual intoxication achieved through sexuality, entheogens, and music, dance and trance.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 304LEC Mesopotamian Archaeology
    Lecture

    Studies the masterpieces of the architecture, painting, and sculpture of the societies that lived in the Tigris and Euphrates Valleys until the era of the Persian Empire.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 306LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary by semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 350LEC Jewish Civilization 2
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 379LEC Theorizing Religion
    Lecture

    This course introduces students to major theories of religion and their applications. Readings will come from a variety of relevant disciplines, including sociology, anthropology, psychology, and cognitive science. Themes considered will include defining religion, understanding the nature of religious experience, decoding the symbolic language of ritual, and mapping the social function of religion.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 382LEC Topics in Talmudic Law
    Lecture

    Specialized studies of how specific Jewish laws developed and their relationship to the larger context of civil and ritual law in Judaism.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 384SEM Maimonides: His Life and Works
    Seminar

    Considered the greatest Jewish philosopher of all time, this course will examine Maimonides? philosophy, comparing it to contemporary Islamic philosophy and Aristotle. Texts include selections from Mishnah Torah, Guide of the Perplexed, and Thirteen Principles of Faith.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 385LEC Maimonides: The Guide for the Perplexed
    Lecture

    Close reading of Maimonides's Guide of the Perplexed.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 389LEC Amer Jewish Experience
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 391LEC Gender, Body, Kabbalah
    Lecture

    In this course, we will explore Jewish Mysticism from its earliest sources in ancient Jewish texts to its contemporary use in New Age Religion. While stories and ideas are important to kabbalah, experience and feeling are its very essence. Mystics seek out deep, transformative, and even potentially destructive feeling with everything they have, beginning with their own, gendered bodies, and the strong emotions most familiar to them through love and sexuality. Often, people cultivate these emotions by means of stories and ritual practices that change or queer gender categories and sexual norms. This class will trace the development of mystical experience and feeling in Jewish mystical narratives and practices over time and space. By the end of the course students will be familiar with the core texts in kabbalah, they will have a good grasp of its cosmological models, and the role of gender, sexuality, and the body in cultivating experience and affect to act on these models.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 396SEM Science and Politics in Jewish Thought
    Seminar

    What is the relationship between science and religion? Is science true and religion merely a myth? How does the relationship between the two affect the structure of human societies? A group of contemporary critics of religion, known as the "New Atheists," such as Christopher Hitchens, Charles Dawkins and Sam Harris, present a scathing and harsh attack on traditional religious doctrines and beliefs seeking to liberate the public sphere from the influence of religion. This course will seek to explore some of the major players in this debate in the Jewish tradition throughout the last thousand years. Topics to be discussed include prophecy, rationality of the commandments, ethics, providence, election, God, creation, dogmas and the meaning of life.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 399LEC Redemption in Jewish Thought
    Lecture

    A survey of various conceptions of Redemption, in contrast to personal salvation or purely secular utopianism, as the central purpose of Judaism.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 401SEM Aspects of American Jewish History
    Seminar

    Selected topics in American Jewish history, from colonial to mid-nineteenth century German-Jewish immigration to later East European immigration; formation of American Judaisms; impact of America on Jews and Jews on America.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 402LEC Jewish Law in Development
    Lecture

    Historical, sociological, and legal concerns in early and later rabbinic literature; how Jewish life and thought relate to trends in legal interpretation though the centuries.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • JDS 426SEM Special Topics
    Seminar

    Topics vary by semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 454LS Medieval Jewish Thought
    Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • JDS 455LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Topics vary by semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • JDS 499TUT Independent Study
    Tutorial

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Jewish Thought

712 Clemens Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14261-0026
Ph: 716-645-0757
W: www.jewishthought.buffalo.edu
Sergey Dolgopolski
Chair
Alexander Green
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Michele Parente
Assistant to the Chair

Complementary Programs

Subjects & Courses

Published: November 16, 2017 08:32:56 AM