Skip to main content.

Law (LAW)

School of Law

405B O'Brian Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260

James G. Milles
Vice Dean for Undergraduate Studies, Professor of Law

Melinda Saran
Vice Dean for Social Justice Initiatives

Associated Programs

LAW Courses

  • The Learning Environment

    The Learning Environment

    Most classes are held in O’Brian Hall, in the same lecture halls and smaller classrooms used for the JD program. Classes range from large lectures to small seminars, and opportunities for practical experience through internships are available. Teaching methods include a version of the Socratic method of questioning typical of law schools, as well as lectures, presentations, debates, discussions, and role playing. Skills include critical thinking, reading and analysis of legal sources, understanding of controversial legal issues, and practical applications of law.

    About Our Facilities

    The School of Law is an ABA-accredited law school with a fully equipped law library and numerous classrooms ranging in size from seminar rooms seating a dozen to lecture halls seating 120. Most classrooms are equipped with computer display technology and audio enhancement, and some are capable of videoconferencing. The Law Library offers excellent collections of legal information resources both in traditional and electronic formats accessible on site or remotely. All faculty offices are designed to allow faculty to meet with small groups of students. The building is fully accessible and is centrally located on the North Campus spine.

    About Our Faculty

    The School of Law has more than 50 full-time faculty, many of whom teach undergraduate courses. Most of the faculty are nationally prominent, and many hold advanced degrees in the social sciences and other disciplines, in addition to their law degrees. Faculty specializations range from advertising law and anthropology of law to women and the law and World Trade Organization law. In addition, the School of Law has over 80 part-time adjunct faculty: skilled lawyers and respected judges who provide education in essential legal skills.

    Faculty List Directory

    Please visit the School of Law faculty directory for faculty information.

  • LAW 101LEC Introduction to the American Legal System
    Lecture

    This required course for Law majors and minors provides an introduction to the study of law in America. We will begin by asking what "law" is, where it comes from, and what preconceptions we have about what it should do. We will then turn to the origins and structure of the American legal system, how our legal decisions are made and preserved, and what effect those decisions have had, and will have, on our institutions and our culture.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • LAW 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • LAW 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • LAW 201LEC Common Law
    Lecture

    This class introduces students to basic concepts in the common-law fields of contract, tort (personal injury), and property. Students will learn what is required to make an agreement legally enforceable; when a person may be held responsible for accidentally injuring another; and about the rights of exclusion and other legal relationships governing control of valued resources. In addition, the class will introduce students to judicial decision-making in common law systems. Students will learn to read cases, identify holdings, and basic practices for communicating about cases. They will learn about precedent, the doctrine of stare decisis, the power of judges to make new rules of the common law, and the social functions of judicial governance of legal relationships created by private individuals.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LAW 202LEC Public Law
    Lecture

    This course will introduce students to public law, which describes the scope and limits of the government¿s authority over individuals. Students will learn about the substantive bodies of law that regulate individual conduct, such as criminal law and governmental regulations. The course will also cover the manner in which these substantive laws are enforced through the governmental institutions¿police, prosecutors, and regulatory agencies¿that are charged with their administration. Last, students will be introduced to constitutional limitations, such as the Bill of Rights, that constrain the power of the government in cases where individual rights are implicated. In short, this course will provide students with a basic understanding of the relationship between the government and the individual in American law.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • LAW 205LEC The Law, Athletes & Sports Management
    Lecture

    This innovative approach to sports law instruction features full on-line access, providing a broad range of experiential knowledge delivered by UB law professors and third-party sports professionals in actual practice. The course will be taught from three perspectives: (1) law and the athlete, (2) law and sports management, and, (3) law and multi-event facility operations. Career employment opportunities in the sports industry for both lawyers and nonlawyer graduates of the program will be identified.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Pass/Not Pass (PNP)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LAW 284LEC Justice in Bibles, Law, and Philosophy
    Lecture

    A comparative study of the relationship between justice, law, and society in pagan, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Thought. This course is the same as JDS 284 and RSP 284, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LAW 301LEC Legal Reasoning
    Lecture

    This class introduces students to the study of legal reasoning, including topics such as: the basic forms of argument, reasoning and inference typically found in legal materials; their relationship to other forms of reasoning; the nature of precedent and forms of argument featuring precedent; legal rules and legal standards; and the relationship of normative arguments in law to conceptions of justice. The class will also introduce students to leading movements in American legal thought, such as formalism, legal realism, legal process, critical legal studies, and law and economics.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LAW 303LEC Lawyers and Clients
    Lecture

    This course provides an introduction to the complex relationship between lawyers and their clients. We will begin by examining how this special relationship developed, then move on to examine how it has been circumscribed by ethical, political, and legal rules. We will look at various examples of the lawyer/client relationship in film, literature, and history.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101.
  • LAW 305LEC Introduction to Criminal Law
    Lecture

    The purpose of the course is to introduce the principles and objectives of substantive criminal law. While considerable attention is placed on examining the doctrinal framework undergirding American criminal law, the course also seeks to develop an understanding of the ways in which the state uses punishment as an instrument of social control. Finally, the course studies the constitutional, statutory, and jurisprudential limitations that are placed on the state¿s authority to punish, and, therefore, its power to use the criminal law as a means of shaping social interactions.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and 201.
  • LAW 306LEC Family Law
    Lecture

    Introduction to family law issues, including proceedings in Family Court and NYS Supreme Court, as well as out-of-court alternative routes (such as mediation, arbitration, separation agreements, prenuptial agreements), enforcement procedures, and agencies with an ancillary role in family law. This course covers the practical aspects of family law in New York State. In addition to general knowledge of family law issues, the focus will be on four areas: custody, child support, separation agreements, and divorce actions. Students will learn which courts handle which types of cases, filing procedures, ethical issues, and substantive law.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and 201.
  • LAW 307LEC Contract Law
    Lecture

    This course provides an overview of contracting practices in the American Economy as might be experienced by employees who are in charge of documenting and monitoring them in businesses of various sizes and of the law that structure such practices as well as clean up when they go wrong. After an introduction to the commonalities across contracting practices, the course highlights four sectors of the economy so that the different, but similar, ways of contracting and making money can be experienced by the students enrolled.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and 201.
  • LAW 308LEC Intellectual Property Law
    Lecture

    This course will introduce students to the theory, doctrine, and institutions behind intellectual property regimes in the United States, including copyright, patent, and trademark. Intellectual property protects a host of human activity, often the things we seek out in our free time or use to make our lives better: music, books, movies, technology. Intellectual property law tries to strike a balance between using the law to encourage this creativity activity while not overly stifling other socially beneficial activities that build on this output. Students will learn what is protectable under each intellectual property regime; the steps required to protect a creative work, brand, trade secret, or invention; the judicial tests for infringement of intellectual property rights; and the defenses, both judicial and statutory, to infringement.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and 201.
  • LAW 309LT Introduction to Business Organizations and Business Law
    Lecture

    This course provides a broad overview of fundamental business law concepts, including legal contracts, business entities and finance. We will look at different types of business entities including their purpose, formation and how business is conducted by a business entity. We will look at business combinations generally, including mergers, joint ventures, licensing deals and asset sales. The course also will provide an overview of securities laws, the uniform commercial code, corporate governance and the negotiation of business deals. We will use a variety of real world examples and scenarios, as well as real documents, to make these concepts relevant.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.
  • LAW 310LEC Employment Law
    Lecture

    This course will introduce students to employees¿ and employers¿ individual rights and responsibilities in an employment relationship under both common law (judicial decisions) and statutory law. This will include a study of matters such as job security, employee mobility, and employees¿ privacy and speech protections. Students will also study the coverage of worker protection statutes with respect to issues such as minimum wage, maximum hours and worker safety.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and 201.
  • LAW 311LEC Banking and Financial Compliance
    Lecture

    This class is designed to give students a practical understanding of the laws and regulations encountered by banking and financial professionals. This course begins with an overview of the ¿dual banking¿ system in the United States and the distinct state and federal regulations and bodies that govern financial institutions. Students will learn to navigate the different sources of regulation, evaluate and prepare guidance memoranda for internal use, and address inquiries and enforcement proceedings brought by regulators.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and LAW 202.
  • LAW 313LEC Sports Law
    Lecture

    This course provides students with an overview of the laws, rules, and regulations that apply to the sports industry. General legal risk management principles will be introduced, which will then be applied in a variety of amateur and professional sports contexts, including both amateur and professional sports entities. The unique nature of both professional and amateur athletics organizations will be examined from both a legal and a business perspective. Amateur eligibility concerns arising from gender, race, and disability issues will also be addressed. Ownership, relocation, and transfer of professional sports franchises will be covered. Finally, a summary view of labor relations in professional sports will provide background for a discussion of the agent-athlete relationship.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.
  • LAW 314LEC Federal Income Tax Law and Policy
    Lecture

    This course is an introduction to federal income tax law in the United States. Law and legal issues, rather than accounting, will be the central focus. Instead of filling out tax returns or working with complex mathematical formulas, we will examine how federal income tax law is created and the policy considerations that underlie their enactment. Students will learn about the roles of the three branches of the federal government in creating, interpreting, and applying federal income tax law. In addition, we will think conceptually (and practically) about how different federal income tax laws apply to different fact situations. In the end, students will learn how to read, interpret, and communicate the various tax authorities relevant to economic and non-economic decisions made by United States persons.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • LAW 315LEC Introduction to International Climate Change Law
    Lecture

    This course will explore legal and policy developments pertaining to climate change. Approaches considered will range in jurisdictional scale, temporal scope, policy orientation, regulatory target, and regulatory objective. Although course readings and discussion will focus on existing and proposed responses to climate change, the overarching aim of the course will be to anticipate how the climate change problem will affect our laws, our organizations, and our lives in the long run.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LAW 401LEC American Legal History
    Lecture

    This course focuses on significant themes and developments in American legal history between 1900 and 1960. It addresses major changes in constitutional law, common law, statutory law, legal theory, and the legal profession as they intersect with, and are spurred by, broader transformations in American society, politics, and culture. In addition to substantive coverage of historical material, we will also explore the emerging field of legal history. Legal history is a relatively new area of scholarship, one that overlaps with the more established and well-known academic disciplines of doctrinal legal studies (taught primarily in law schools), and social and political history, but that is distinct in its methodologies, areas of inquiry, and foundational assumptions. We will explore what eminent legal historians have to say about the boundaries of this field and how the study of legal history can help us understand the past as well as the present and future of American law, policy, and the legal system.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and HIS 162.Advanced elective for majors; general elective for minors.
  • LAW 402LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Specialized topics in law.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: LAW 101 and LAW 201 or LAW 202
  • LAW 404LEC The Jury Trial
    Lecture

    This course will introduce students to the origins, history, procedures, and challenges of the jury trial.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: LAW 101, LAW 201, LAW 202.
  • LAW 473LEC Information Privacy Law
    Lecture

    This course introduces students to various aspects of privacy and information law, including changing understandings of the very concepts of privacy and information. We will study different approaches by which law has attempted to protect privacy and access to information, including contract and tort law, statutory and regulatory protections, and criminal law. We will also address the roles of privacy and management of information in corporate governance, litigation, government information and national security, and the obligations of lawyers to protect client privacy. This course is dual-listed with LAW 573.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • LAW 495TUT Supervised Undergraduate Teaching
    Tutorial

    Undergraduate teaching assistants (UTAs) assist professors and adjunct instructors in preparing and grading assignments, exercises, and teaching materials, and tutoring students in the instructor¿s primary courses. In the course of this work the UTAs learn to thoroughly understand the material being taught. Helping to instruct the students is a valuable learning experience for the UTAs.

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: Junior status, overall GPA 3.0 or higher, minimum grade of A- in the course for which the student will assist, permission of instructor
 
Published: Aug 31, 2020 13:27:41