2017-18
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Linguistics (LIN)

Linguistics

609 Baldy Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-1030
Ph: 716-645-2177
F: 716-645-3825
W: www.linguistics.buffalo.edu
Jean-Pierre Koenig
Chair
Jeff Good
Director of Undergraduate Studies

The Learning Environment

The program in Linguistics offers a variety of courses types from large lecture classes to small seminars. Many of the more advanced undergraduate courses are combined with graduate offerings, allowing undergraduates to get early exposure to graduate-style coursework. Faculty also regularly offer independent studies for students interested in areas that do not match the program's regular offerings. The program provides a capstone experience through a senior seminar on field methods, where students work with a speaker of a language that is unfamiliar to them to learn about its grammar. It also offers an internship program where students learn about language teaching in local public schools.

About Our Facilities

The Department of Linguistics is housed in Baldy Hall, and has several dedicated classrooms and meeting spaces. The department also holds classes in centrally scheduled space throughout the campus, which includes traditional classrooms and lecture halls that can accommodate our the program’s different class structures. Members of the faculty also maintain their own research labs to support work in areas such as phonetics and computational linguistics.

About Our Faculty

The faculty of the Linguistics department includes internationally known and respected scholars whose research specializations include phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, typology, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, sociolinguistics, and historical linguistics. Faculty work on a variety of languages including German, Japanese, and Korean as well as languages of the Americas, Africa, and the Pacific.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit our department website for additional information about our faculty.

Courses


  • LIN 104LEC Writing Systems
    Lecture

    Surveys the ways in which natural languages have been, and are today, represented graphically throughout the world. We examine several types of systems (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, and alphabetic) and examine the linguistic principles that underlie each of these systems.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 106LEC Languages of the World
    Lecture

    Overview of the languages and language families of the world. This course introduces students to the sounds and structures of a variety of languages and to the history and geography of the people who speak them. Students gain an understanding of the world's linguistic and cultural diversity that will help them better appreciate the relationship between language and the mind.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • LIN 108LEC Roots of English
    Lecture

    Word roots in English, their history and development, meanings and combinations, usage and variations. Borrowings into and from English. English as a world language.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • LIN 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • LIN 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • LIN 200LR Language in Pluralistic America
    Lecture

    Explores the many varieties of English and the many different languages that co-exist in the United States, including immigrant and indigenous languages, as well as sign languages and contact varieties "born" in the USA. We look at the history of linguistic diversity in this country and its relationship to differences of ethnicity, gender, sexuality and a number of other factors and compare the U.S. situation to that in other parts of the world.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LIN 205LEC Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
    Lecture

    Introduces the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax), looking at a broad variety of languages; approaches to linguistic analysis and theory.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • LIN 207LEC Language, Society, and the Individual
    Lecture

    Explores the many facets of language's role as an interface between the mind of one human being and the minds of others. Investigates how language is supported by and processed in the brain; how it is learned by children and adults; how it can vary and change; and how people and groups use linguistic differences to define and express who they are and how they relate to others. Major topics include language contact, bilingualism, and the relationship between language, culture, and thought.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • LIN 275LEC Languages and Cultures of Native North America
    Lecture

    Expression of meaning and linguistic concepts in a number of native languages of North America.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LIN 301LEC Structure of English: The Sound System
    Lecture

    Sound structure of English, including the articulation of sounds, phonological patterns and alternations, and dialects.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LIN 205
  • LIN 302LEC Structure of English: Grammar and Lexicon
    Lecture

    Syntax and morphology of English, including lexical and grammatical categories, basic clause structure, and complex sentences.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: LIN 205
  • LIN 311LEC Variation in English
    Lecture

    Introduction to major regional dialects and contact varieties of English speaking world and to many dimensions of social variation in British and North American English. Hands-on activities and projects will help familiarize students with the theories and methods of dialectology and variations sociolinguistics.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 315LEC Language in Its Social Setting
    Lecture

    Analyzes the social basis of conversational interaction on two levels: the linguistic structures of dialogue and the cultural models underlying interaction.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 320LEC Language and the Brain
    Lecture

    Localization and lateralization of language in the brain; aphasia, dyslexia, and other neurolinguistic disorders; developmental neurolinguistics.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 342LEC Introduction to Cognitive Science
    Lecture

    An interdisciplinary approach to the understanding of knowledge and mind, guided by principles of formal systems and computation. Concepts and approaches from psychology, philosophy, artificial intelligence, linguistics, and neuroscience.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LIN 345LEC Natural Language and the Computer
    Lecture

    Natural language applications such as search engines, and speech recognition play an increasingly important role in society. It seems like a very simple process, and yet it is very difficult. This class addresses the problems faced by computers in dealing with human language.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 355LEC Child Language Development
    Lecture

    Acquisition of the structure and function of a child's native language. Relationships among the development of language, cognition, biology, and social interaction.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LIN 356LEC An Introduction to Contemporary Theories of Metaphor
    Lecture

    General overview of the analysis of metaphors and analogy from a linguistic and cognitive perspective.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: Completion of Communication Literacy 1 or completion of Writing Skills 1 (ENG 101 or placement into ENG 201)
  • LIN 404LEC Discourse-Pragmatics
    Lecture

    Use of language in communicative acts (e.g., speech acts, conversational principles, text structure, discourse-governed grammatical alternations, topic, focus, and theme).

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 301 and LIN 302
  • LIN 405LEC Bilingualism and Language Contact
    Lecture

    Linguistic, psychological, educational, and sociocultural characteristics of bilingualism, multilingualism, and language contact.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Other Requisites: LIN 405 Requisites
  • LIN 410LEC Morphology
    Lecture

    Structure of words; different theoretical approaches to the analysis of morphemes, words, and idioms.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 302
  • LIN 413LEC Language and Cognition
    Lecture

    Examines classificatory phenomena in lexical and grammatical structure from a cross-linguistic perspective, focusing on African, European, East Asian, and Native American languages.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 205 and LIN 207
  • LIN 414SEM History of the English Language
    Seminar

    Introduces the linguistic and cultural development of the English language from its beginnings to the present.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 415LEC Syntax I
    Lecture

    Fundamentals of syntactic analysis, applied to data from a wide range of languages. Briefly introduces syntactic theory.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: LIN 205
  • LIN 417LEC Psycholinguistics
    Lecture

    Psycholinguistic processes involved in producing and comprehending language, including speech sounds, meaning, lexicon, syntax, discourse, and literacy.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 205 and LIN 207
  • LIN 421LEC Linguistic Anthropology
    Lecture

    Relationship between language and culture cross-culturally from the point of view of linguistic anthropology. Relies on primary readings, looking both at descriptive studies of particular languages and cultures, and theoretical issues, specifically the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 207
  • LIN 425LEC Typology and Universals
    Lecture

    Ways in which languages are similar to and different from each other, including morphological categories, word order, case marking, and grammatical relations.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 302 or LIN 415
  • LIN 426LEC Comparative Syntactic Theories
    Lecture

    The objective of the proposed course is to offer a survey of important modern (i.e. post-1950) approaches to syntactic theory. Theoretical models to be covered include various transformationalist approaches, Head-drive Phrase Structure Grammar, Lexical Functional Grammar, Role and Reference Grammar, and typological and functional approaches. The leading ideas of each theoretical framework will be presented, and the frameworks will be compared and contrasted with each other, both in terms of the overall models they adopt and in how they use linguistic data to support their models.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 415
  • LIN 431LEC Phonetics
    Lecture

    Fundamental aspects of phonetics: articulation, aerodynamics, acoustics, suprasegmentals, phonetic features, sound change, and universals; focus on cross-linguistic analysis.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: LIN 301
  • LIN 432LEC Phonology I
    Lecture

    Thorough grounding in phonological analysis, using data from a wide variety of languages. Briefly introduces phonological theory.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: LIN 301
  • LIN 433LEC Phonology II
    Lecture

    Current developments in phonological theory, including derivational and non-derivational approaches.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: LIN 432
  • LIN 434LEC Syntax 2
    Lecture

    Introduces contemporary syntactic theory, including generative and non-generative approaches.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 415LEC
  • LIN 437LEC The Syntax of Romance
    Lecture

    Introduces the syntactic structure of Romance languages, what makes them similar (and distinct from other Indo-European language families, e.g. Germanic languages like English) and how they differ from each other. Languages covered include Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 415
  • LIN 438LEC Semantics
    Lecture

    Introduces basic concepts and methods in the analysis of natural language meaning.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: LIN 205
  • LIN 439LEC Historical Linguistics
    Lecture

    Language change, the divergence and convergence of dialects and languages in time and space, and linguistic reconstruction.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
    Prerequisites: LIN 432
  • LIN 443LEC Semantics II
    Lecture

    Introduces the description of the meaning of sentences; focuses on how the meaning of sentences is built from the meaning of individual words.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
    Prerequisites: LIN 415
  • LIN 452LEC Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar
    Lecture

    The goal of the proposed course is to offer a solid introduction to Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar (HPSG), a formal theory of grammar which allows for detailed accounts of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. The course addresses the historical background and the mathematical foundations, but it focuses on linguistic analysis and on critical assessment of course research.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 415
  • LIN 455LEC Language Acquisition
    Lecture

    Surveys the child's and the L2 adult's linguistic development, primarily in phonology, morpho-syntax, semantics, and discourse; current controversies in acquisition theory.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: (LIN 301 and 302) or (LIN 415 and 432)
  • LIN 465LEC Introduction to Dialectology
    Lecture

    Dialect in its diachronic and synchronic manifestations; social and regional variation; languages in contact; linguistic fieldwork.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
    Prerequisites: LIN 432
  • LIN 467LEC Computational Linguistics
    Lecture

    Introduces the field of computational linguistics, which is concerned with the understanding and use of language by computers.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 493LEC Sociolinguistics
    Lecture

    Language structure and development in social contexts of speech communities; processes of linguistic change; linguistic behavior as an index of social status; problems of language or dialect minorities.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • LIN 494SEM Senior Seminar
    Seminar

    Advanced seminar on various topics.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • LIN 496TUT Internship
    Tutorial

    Language teaching experience either in a UB department (Linguistics, a language department, English Language Institute, etc.), in the Buffalo public schools, or at a public service agency (International Institute of Buffalo, Herman Badillo Institute, Literacy Volunteers, etc.). Open to majors and non-majors. Apply to director of undergraduate studies.

    Credits: 2 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • LIN 497TUT Honors Thesis
    Tutorial

    Guidance in, and supervision of, the preparation of a research essay required to complete a degree with honors. Apply to director of undergraduate studies.

    Credits: 3 - 6
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • LIN 499TUT Independent Study
    Tutorial

    Apply to director of undergraduate studies.

    Credits: 1 - 12
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
Published: March 29, 2017 12:20:16 PM