2018-19
Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog

Media Study (DMS)

Media Study

231 Center for the Arts
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-6020
Ph: 716-645-6902
F: 716-645-6979
W: www.mediastudy.buffalo.edu
Thomas Feeley, PhD
Chair
Bradley Hendricks
Assistant to the Chair for Student Programs

The Learning Environment

DMS has a long history of combining situated, context specific learning with theoretical discourses. By combining making objects with thinking of objects, students in DMS are trained to think holistically about media as contextualized systems.
Our undergraduate courses range for 20 to 100 students, depending on the topic. Many of our courses are offered on-line over the summer and winter recesses.

About Our Facilities

Media Study maintains a range of state-of-the-art equipment and facilities integral to the practice of media arts production including: a student accessible equipment pool with hundreds of pieces of equipment for traditional and emerging media creation (video production, computational media, virtual reality); computer labs with the latest industry-standard and open-source software for digital audio and video editing, computational media, multimedia creation, game design, 3D printing and prototyping; a large production studio with green screen and lighting grid; smart classrooms; a 200+ seat auditorium with high definition projection and sound.

About Our Faculty

The Department of Media Study faculty is among the most distinguished in the university and are recognized internationally for their work in their respective fields.

Faculty List Directory

Please visit the Media Study department website for additional information about our faculty.

DMS Courses


  • DMS 100LEC Indian Image On Film
    Lecture

    Discusses the fabricated image of Native Americans in American film history, the media process that perpetuates such images, and the resulting stereotypes; also covers the relationship to social movements and alternatives for overcoming stereotypes. This course is the same as AMS 100, and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 101SEM Basic Filmmaking
    Seminar

    Equipment, materials, and techniques involved in the construction of motion pictures; nature and process of the medium; 8mm and 16mm film. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 102SEM Basic Filmmaking
    Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • DMS 103SEM Basic Video
    Seminar

    Image and sound formation; energy and time structures observed on the cathode ray tube; competency with basic video equipment in production of tapes. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 104SEM Basic Video
    Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • DMS 105SEM Basic Documentary
    Seminar

    The fundamental theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 106SEM Basic Documentary
    Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • DMS 107LEC Film & Media History 1
    Lecture

    Surveys developments in international cinema from the 1890s to the present.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 108LAB Film History II
    Laboratory

    Surveys developments in international cinema from the 1890s to the present.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • DMS 108LEC Film & Media History II
    Lecture

    Surveys developments in international cinema from the 1890s to the present.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • DMS 109LEC Introduction to Film and Media Interpretation
    Lecture

    Identification of and intellectual appreciation for the elements of film as a major art form.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 110LEC Programming for Digital Art
    Lecture

    Introduces students to programming in a general purpose computer language. Discusses the underlying fundamentals of how computers, electronics, and digital media work; and the mathematical bases of these fields. Presents students with ways that programming can be used in creating new, interactive, digital media art. Recommended for students interested in programming graphics and virtual reality. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 121SEM Basic Digital Arts
    Seminar

    This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. A lab fee is associated with this class.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 122SEM Basic Digital Arts
    Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • DMS 149SEM Asian Amer Exp On Film
    Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • DMS 152LR Visual Studies
    Lecture

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Varies
  • DMS 155LAB Introduction to New Media
    Laboratory

    Introduces desk top tools and fundamental concepts used in the development of interactive and non-interactive digital media. Focuses on theoretical and practical aspects of creating digital messages with authoring/presentation tools. Provides a foundation for creating a broad range of digital media.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Corequisites: Students must enroll in DMS 155LAB and DMS 155LEC in the same term.
  • DMS 155LEC Introduction to New Media
    Lecture

    Introduces desk top tools and fundamental concepts used in the development of interactive and non-interactive digital media. Focuses on theoretical and practical aspects of creating digital messages with authoring/presentation tools. Provides a foundation for creating a broad range of digital media.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Corequisites: Students must enroll in DMS 155LAB and DMS 155LEC in the same term.
  • DMS 193SEM Fundamentals of Journalism
    Seminar

    Introduction to journalism that uses Buffalo as a backdrop to finding news and topics for feature stories. Course includes practice in the basic techniques of journalism, including finding and producing a print and broadcast news story on deadline, thinking in relation to the screen, and packaging stories for the web and broadcast media. This course will teach you to think, act and write like a journalist. The course is a gateway into the Journalism Certificate program and will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing for print, broadcast and the web. We will cover essential reporting tools (researching, interviewing, observing) and learn to write hard news stories, short features, blogs, TV broadcasts and reported opinion pieces. You may even write the same story for three different mediums. By the end of the semester, you will be able to produce a news story on deadline for print or web and develop news feature ideas and report and write them competently. If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. In the classroom, in addition to lectures, presentations, discussions and assignment reviews, students will do writing exercises, lots of writing exercises. Outside the classroom, students will cover assignments in the city. To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times and Buffalo News every day. This course is the same as ENG 193 and course repeat rules will apply. Students should consult with their major department regarding any restrictions on their degree requirements.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • DMS 198SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    The one credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps transition to UB through an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 198 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the UB seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • DMS 199SEM UB Seminar
    Seminar

    There is a fee associated with this course. The three credit UB Seminar is focused on a big idea or challenging issue to engage students with questions of significance in a field of study and, ultimately, to connect their studies with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Other Requisites: Students who have already successfully completed the first year seminar course may not repeat this course. If you have any questions regarding enrollment for this course, please contact your academic advisor.
  • DMS 200LEC Visual Studies Speakers
    Lecture

    Credits: 1
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • DMS 201LEC Green Media
    Lecture

    Polar bears pacing frantically on melting ice; SUVs gloriously conquering mountain terrain; post-civilization humans struggling for survival on a devastated earth: contemporary media reflects our fears and fantasies about our rapidly changing environment. This course analyzes fictional and documentary media that investigate our relationship to nature: climate change, pollution, environmental justice, wildlife extinction. The course interprets the word media broadly to include film, games, social media, media-art, big data visualization, simulation and sensing. It examines the consciousness-raising power of film, media and journalism; traces the ecological impact of our obsession with the latest media device; and ponders the relationship between our feelings about our changing planet (denial, engagement, optimism, hopelessness) and our actions.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Spring
  • DMS 211LEC PLASMA: Performance, Screenings, and Lectures in Media Art
    Lecture

    Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a new speakers series in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Six guests will visit the course throughout the semester, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • DMS 212LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    A variety of media production and theory topics. Please check the Department of Media Study website for course descriptions. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 3
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 213LEC Immigration and Film
    Lecture

    Examines silent and early sound films, as well as contemporary films; as a reflection of the immigrant experience, as a site of struggle between older and newer immigrants, and as an instrument of government politics.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 215LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 216LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 217SEM Special Topics
    Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 218LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    A variety of media production and theory topics. Please check the Department of Media Study website for course description. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 219LEC Special Topics
    Lecture

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
  • DMS 220LEC Machines, Codes and Cultures
    Lecture

    This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, inventions and automation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and critical design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions. Grades will be based on a mid-semester position paper, a multiple choice final exam as well as participation in class discussions and a voluntary extra credit assignment. This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, inventions and automation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and critical design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall
  • DMS 221SEM Web Development
    Seminar

    Involves analyzing and creating web-based media for a variety of communication purposes. There is a fee associated with this class.

    Credits: 4
    Grading: Graded (GRD)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
    Prerequisites: DMS 110 or DMS 121 or CSE 115.
  • DMS 225LEC Digital Literature Review
    Lecture

    Intensive survey of the field of digital literature through a focus on the screening of digital texts. Primary emphasis is on "reading" the digital texts presented. Course also covers the relationship of innovative poetry to digital media, the phenomenon of the Internet and its relation to "the I", meaning-making through the context, design, and writerly qualities of Web pages, traditions of hypertext, the materiality of code, the history of e-poetry, and digital media poetry in the academy. Special attention will be given to understanding a broad range of innovative works in the medium including hypertext, digital and kinetic literature, interactive texts, and works in networked and programmable media, and to examining, interpreting, and interrogating the key theoretical texts of the most significant practitioners in the field. Includes foundational early theory, writings from formative scholarly hypertext theorists, and work by more recent cutting-edge independent digital theorists. Examines the role of programming as a social, literary, and language-related act. The cultural impact of films